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Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources

M.L. 2003 Projects

M.L. 2003 Projects

MN Laws 2003, Chapter 128, Article 1, Section 9 (beginning July 1, 2003)

NOTE: If a project has been completed the Final Report has been posted under the project descriptions here. For projects still underway, contact us to obtain the most up-to-date work programs (project updates are required twice each year).

The following documents are short abstracts for projects funded during the 2004-2005 Biennium. The final date of completion for these projects is listed at the end of the abstract. When available, we have provided links to a projects web site. The sites linked to this page are not created, maintained, or endorsed by the LCMR/LCCMR office or the Minnesota Legislature.


Subd. 03  Administration
Subd. 04  Advisory Committee
Subd. 05  Fish & Wildlife Habitat
Subd. 06  Recreation
Subd. 07  Water Resources
Subd. 08  Land Use and Natural Resource Information
Subd. 09  Agriculture & Natural Resource Industries
Subd. 10  Energy
Subd. 11  Environmental Education
Subd. 12  Children's Environmental Education


Subd. 03  Administration
03aLegislative Commission on Minnesota Resources
03bLCMR Study Commission on the Park System
03cContract Administration
 
Subd. 04  Advisory Committee
 
Subd. 05  Fish & Wildlife Habitat
05aRestoring Minnesota's Fish and Wildlife Habitat Corridors - Phase II
05bMetropolitan Area Wildlife Corridors
05cRestoring RIM Match
05dAcquisition & Development of Scientific and Natural Areas
05eForest and Prairie Stewardship of Public & Private Lands
05fLocal Initiative Grants (Conservation Partners & Env. Partnerships)
05gMinnesota ReLeaf Community Forest Development and Protection
05hDeveloping Pheromones for Use in Carp Control - RESEARCH
05i1Biological Control of European Buckthorn and Spotted Knapweed - RESEARCH
05i2Biological Control of European Buckthorn and Spotted Knapweed - RESEARCH
05jResources for Redevelopment of Brownfields to Greenspace
 
Subd. 06  Recreation
06aState Park and Recreation Area Land Acquisition
06bLAWCON Federal Reimbursements
06cLocal Initiative Grants (Parks and Natural Areas)
06dMetropolitan Regional Parks Acquisition, Rehabilitation and
06eLocal and Regional Trail Grant Initiative Program
06fGitchi-Gami State Trail
06gWater Recreation: Boat Access, Fishing Piers & Shorefishing
06hMesabi Trail
06iLinking Communities Design, Technology & DNR Trail Resources
06jFt. Ridgely Historic Site Interpretive Trail
06kDevelopment and Rehabilitation of Minnesota Shooting Ranges
06lLand Acquisition, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum - continuation
 
Subd. 07  Water Resources
07aLocal Water Planning (LWP) Matching Challenge Grants
07bAccelerating & Enhancing Surface Water Monitoring for Lakes & Streams
07cIntercommunity Groundwater Protection
07dTAPwaters: Technical Assistance Program for Watersheds
07e1Wastewater Phosphorus Control and Reduction Initiative - RESEARCH
07e2Wastewater Phosphorus Control and Reduction Initiative - RESEARCH
07fMaintaining Zooplankton (Daphnia) for Water Quality: Square Lake - RESEARCH
 
Subd. 08  Land Use and Natural Resource Information
08aMinnesota County Biological Survey
08bUpdating Outmoded Soil Survey
08c1Mesabi Iron Range Geologic & Hydrologic Maps & Data Bases
08c2Mesabi Iron Range Geologic & Hydrologic Maps & Data Bases
 
Subd. 09  Agriculture & Natural Resource Industries
09Native Plants and Alternative Crops for Water Quality - RESEARCH
 
Subd. 10  Energy
10aCommunity Energy Development Program
10bAdvancing Utilization of Manure Methane Digester Electrical
 
Subd. 11  Environmental Education
11aDodge Nature Center - Restoration Plan
11bBucks and Buckthorn: Engaging Young Hunters in Restoration
11cPutting Green Environmental Adventure Park: Sustainability
 
Subd. 12  Children's Environmental Education
12aHealthy Schools: Indoor Air Quality and Asthma Management
12bEconomic-based Analysis of Children's Environmental Health Risks
12cContinuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in MN Schools


Funding Sources: (**note: all projects are TF, unless otherwise noted)
Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund (TF)
Oil Overcharge (OOC)
Great Lakes Protection Account (GLP)


Subd. 03  Administration


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Legislative Commission on Minnesota Resources
Subd. 03a    $672,000

John Velin, Director
LCMR
100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Blvd.
65 - State Office Building
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-2406
Email:  lccmr@lccmr.leg.mn
Fax:  (651) 296-1321
Web:  http://www.lccmr.leg.mn

For the Administrative Budget for expenses of the LCMR. In addition, carryforward from 02-03 of $196,000 for administrative expenses.

This project completed: 06/30/2005


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LCMR Study Commission on the Park System
Subd. 03b    $26,000

John Velin, Director
LCMR
100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Blvd.
65 - State Office Building
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-2406
Email:  lccmr@lccmr.leg.mn
Fax:  (651) 296-1321
Web:  http://www.lccmr.leg.mn

Evaluate the use of fees to assist the financial stability and the potential of fees to provide for self-sufficiency in Minnesota's park systems, including state parks, metropolitan regional parks, and rural regional parks in greater Minnesota. The study commission will report to the chairs of the senate and house environment finance committees by February 16, 2004. Copy of the report on the LCCMR website: http://www.commissions.leg.state.mn.us/lcmr/Parks%20Study%20Comm/study%20page.htm and available in the LCCMR office.

Project completed: 02/16/2004


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Contract Administration
Subd. 03c    $120,000

Bill Becker
DNR, Office of Management and Budget Services
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-2406
Email:  bill.becker@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-1321

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Recipients, on the whole, provided requested information for reimbursement. There have been few if any problems with the written instructions. Recipients also seem to grasp the force of the work program and are improving their understanding of the work program and related fiscal controls. There still seem to be some issues in transferring the information from work program Attachment A to the Reimbursement Request Spreadsheet. It may be that reformatting is in order for future years. For example, we could convert the Reimbursement Request Spreadsheet from a horizontal alignment to a vertical alignment to differentiate it from Attachment A.

The agreement form was revised for 2005 appropriations. It appears to be fairly stable now, not needing significant revision unless the revised Legislative Citizen Commission on Minnesota resources sees a need for changes. New recipients were briefed on the agreement and the process for requesting reimbursements, however we recommend a refresher course for long time recipients.

Reimbursements were provided quickly to minimize cash flow problems. As we transfer to 2005, open projects include appropriations from M.L. of 1999 and 2005.

Appropriations from 2003 closed in June 30th of 2006. The project now has 55 agreements under management

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The financial administration of these projects is subject to audit by the Office of the Legislative Auditor and the DNR auditor (at DNR expense). The Office of the Legislative Auditor selected a sample of these projects to audit as part of a performance audit of the executive branch administration of grants to non-governmental organizations. That audit is due out in January,2007.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


Subd. 04  Advisory Committee


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Citizen Advisory Committee for the Trust Fund
Subd. 04    $45,000

John Velin, Director
100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Blvd.
65 - State Office Building
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-2406
Email:  lccmr@lccmr.leg.mn
Fax:  (651) 296-1321
Web:  http://www.lccmr.leg.mn

For expenses of the citizen advisory committee for the Environment & Natural Resources Trust Fund as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 116P.06. The committee is appointed by the Governor and consists of 11 members, at least 1 from each of the 8 MN Congressional Districts.

In M.L. 2005, 1st Special Session, Chp. 7, Sec. 37 the appropriation was transferred to the advisory task force in Chp. 1, Art. 2, Sec. 156.


Subd. 05  Fish and Wildlife Habitat


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Restoring Minnesota's Fish and Wildlife Habitat Corridors - Phase II
Subd. 05a    $4,850,000

Matt Holland
Pheasants Forever and 14 Organizations
679 W. River
New London, MN 56273

Phone:  (320) 354-4377
Email:  ringneck@tds.net
Fax:  (320) 354-4377

The mission of the Habitat Corridors Partnership is to restore, enhance and conserve habitat corridors for the purpose of sustaining fish, wildlife and native plant communities for all generations. This report and additional information can be uploaded on the web at http://www.mnhabitatcorridors.org.

The Habitat Corridors Partnership includes: Ducks Unlimited, Fond du Lac Reservation, Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources, MN Deer Hunters Association, MN Department of Natural Resources, MN Land Trust, MN Valley National Wildlife Refuge Trust, Inc., National Wild Turkey Federation, Pheasants Forever, Red Lake Band of Chippewa, The Nature Conservancy, Trust for Public Land, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services, and U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service. The intent of the partnership was to use existing programs and partners to build upon existing investments in habitat to enhance fish, wildlife and plant populations, strengthen migration pathways, improve genetic stocks, and restore the integrity of natural communities. Eleven project areas were identified where Habitat Corridors Partners work was completed. The partnership used three pri mary methods to achieve partnership goals within the project areas: habitat restoration, habitat easements, and fee-title acquisition. All projects were completed on public lands or with the cooperation of willing private landowner partners.

Overall Phase II Accomplishments:
Partners completed a total of 368 (13) projects impacting 28,304 acres (10,825 TF, 17,479 Other Funds). Partners expended a total of $24,527,846 ($4,681,430 TF, $19,846,415 Other Funds).

Restoration
Partners completed a total of 243 (13) projects enhancing or restoring a total of 17,182.7 acres (9,066 TF, 8,116 Other Funds). Partners expended a total of $3,679,971 ($1,293,902 TF, $2,386,068 Other Funds).

Easement
Partners acquired a total of 80 easements for a total of 7,160 acres (982 Grant, 6,178 Other Funds). Partners expended a total of $15,427,065 ($1,281,999 TF, $14,145,066 Other Funds).

Acquisitions
Partners acquired 38 parcels for a total of 3,961 acres (776 Grant, 3,184 Other Funds). Partners expended a total of $4,994,715 ($1,975,339 TF, $3,019,375 Other Funds).

Project Coordinating & Mapping
Pheasants Forever, Inc. provided project coordination for the Phase II Habitat Corridors Partnership. Community GIS Services of Duluth was contracted to do mapping and data management. One significant accomplishment included the development of an online reporting system. This system provides for a synthesis of fiscal, accomplishment, and mapping accomplishment reporting via an easy to use online reporting framework. A total of $130,188 (TF) was expended on project coordination and mapping.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Metropolitan Area Wildlife Corridors
Subd. 05b    $4,850,000

Kate Drewry
DNR
1200 Warner Rd
St. Paul, MN 55106

Phone:  (651) 772-7946
Email:  kate.drewry@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 772-7977

Through the Metropolitan Area Wildlife Corridors (MWC) partnership, 13 organizations (Ducks Unlimited, Friends of the Mississippi River , Great River Greening, Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Trust, Inc., Minnesota Land Trust , The Trust for Public Land , DNR - Regional Operations (Metro Greenways), DNR - Division of Ecological Services, DNR - Division of Fisheries , DNR - Division of Forestry , DNR - Division of Wildlife , Rice Creek Watershed District, and City of Ramsey) restored 2,297 acres of habitat including 2 miles of shoreline, and protected through conservation easements and/or fee title acquisition 2219 acres of regionally significant habitat including 6 miles of shoreline; all in targeted locations within a regional framework of science- based, interconnected focus areas. The $4.5 million of Environment & Natural Resources Trust Fund dollars spent leveraged an additional $19.3 million in private, local and federal funds, plus $2.4 million in other state funds to achieve these results.

By coordinating land protection and restoration efforts within a regional framework of focus areas, resource management agencies, nonprofits, local government units and other stakeholders developed beneficial synergies and built upon each other's efforts.

Partners collaborated through regular partner meetings and communications. A database and GIS tools were used to identify target project areas and document the work of the partners. Local involvement was facilitated through outreach to stakeholders in the focus areas, who were provided with natural resource information and technical assistance to help them develop and participate in conservation projects. The "Conservation Corridors" poster/brochure was completed and wildly distributed as an outreach and educational tool.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Restoring RIM Match
Subd. 05c    $400,000

Kim Hennings
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 297-2823
Email:  kim.hennings@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-4961

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The Reinvest in Minnesota (RIM) Program provides an opportunity for private individuals, groups, and businesses to help fund the acquisition or improvement of critical fish, wildlife, and native plant habitats. Private contributions of land, easements, or cash to this program are matched dollar-for-dollar by state funds. The state matching dollars are used to acquire or develop other critical natural resource habitat.

This project generated $400,000 in private donations to the State that included $17,400 in cash and $355,600 in land donations as well as $27,000 in contributions from the Nongame Checkoff Program. Donations involved 359 acres of land that were designated as 7 state wildlife management (WMA) and 2 state aquatic management areas. Trust fund dollars used to match these donations funded 7 land purchases totaling 239 acres in 7 WMAs and one forest hardwood seeding project. All of these lands will permanently protect critical habitat and provide additional opportunities for public hunting, fishing, and other compatible outdoor recreational activities.

The Nongame Program matched $27,000 of trust fund dollars to help fund a survey and assessment of prairie birds, especially rare species, inhabiting 18 Scientific and Natural Areas on prairie tracts in NW MN, and an additional 7 sites on lands with Prairie Bank easements. The trust fund dollars for this prairie bird survey generated $27,000 in federal matching funds under the "State Wildlife Grants" program for "species in greatest conservation need." A research report will be published and available from the DNR Nongame Research Program and on the DNR website.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Information and location of the lands acquired under this project are included on the Wildlife Lands Map available at the DNR and on the DNR website at http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/maps/compass.

The results of the survey and assessment of prairie birds in northwestern Minnesota will be posted on the DNR Nongame Research Project site at http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/ecological_services/nongame/projects/research_reports.

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Acquisition & Development of Scientific and Natural Areas
Subd. 05d    $480,000

Bob Djupstrom
DNR - Division of Ecological Services
500 Lafayette Road, Bx 25
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 259-5088
Email:  bob.djupstrom@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-1811
Web:  http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/fish_and_wildlife/sna

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Funding to acquire scientific and natural areas (SNA) was used to purchase a state significant tract of land with oak forest and tamarack bog plant communities. The site also provides habitat for red-shouldered hawks, a rare species. A total of twenty-nine (29) landowners were contacted concerning protection. Eight (8) agreed to have an appraisal conducted. Three landowners were willing to sell. Only one site was acquired, however, due to funding limitations. LCMR funds were used to acquire 50 acres of land, known as the Avon Hills Forest SNA in Stearns County. An additional 210 acres of land from the same landowner was acquired with RIM, critical habitat license plate and bond funds.

Two parcels appraised during this project maybe acquired in the future contingent on the availability of new funds. One of these parcels is available for sale at the appraised offer. An offer on the second parcel will be made pending funding availability. In addition, a third site in Redwood County, appraised with LCMR funds, was acquired with other funds. Landowner contacts as a result of this LCMR project are resulting in follow-up calls from landowners in the vicinity of projects.

Funding also permitted the development of SNAs using crews, Sentence to Service personnel, & volunteers. A total of over seventy-five development activities were carried out. These included burning 220 acres of prairie at 6 sites, constructing 2 miles of fence, treating woody encroachment on 50 acres at nine sites, putting in 5.5. miles of fire breaks, carrying out prairie improvements at 21 sites including collecting and planting seeds and treating exotic species, sealing one well, restoring woodlands at 3 sites and at 25 sites installing visitor use, wood routed, or boundary signs, gates or carrying out site clean-up.

In summary, funds provided through the LCMR have been successfully used to protect a state significant tract of land as a State Scientific and Natural Areas for native plant communities and rare animals and to improve numerous SNAs by carrying out over seventy-five management projects. In addition, contacts made with landowners are resulting in new requests for appraisals that in turn will result in the future protection of additional lands with state significant examples of plant communities, rare species habitat or unique natural features.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Forest and Prairie Stewardship of Public & Private Lands
Subd. 05e    $392,000

Peter Buesseler
DNR
1509 1st Ave. N
Fergus Falls, MN 56537

Phone:  (218) 739-7497
Email:  peter.buesseler@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (218) 739-7601
Web:  http://www.foreststeward.org

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
This project targeted two key natural resources: private forestland and native prairie. Private (non industrial) landowners own 40% (5,000,000+ acres) of the forestland in Minnesota . These acres have been identified as critical to the overall sustainability of our forest resources. Less than one percent of the state's native prairie remains. Seventy-five percent of these remnant acres are on private land.

The purpose of this project was to 1) provide stewardship advice to private landowners to improve the sustainability of native prairie and forest habitat on their property; 2) cost-share stewardship practices on private forest land; and 3) accelerate prairie management on priority public and private native prairie sites.

Result #1: Landowner Motivation Through Stewardship Plans: Qualified private sector professionals were used to develop sustainable, ecosystem-based land stewardship plans. Each plan requires a field inventory of the resources and adds to the landscape information base. Plans offer alternatives to meet both landowner and landscape objectives. Accomplishments: Woodland Stewardship Plans: 127 plans were written on 11835 acres statewide; Prairie Stewardship Plans: 20 plans were written on 1950 acres.

Result #2: Cost Sharing To Convert Forest Stewardship Plans To Action: Private land improvements were cost-shared 50% by the landowner, and 50% by state and/or federal funds. Practices ranged from planting seedlings, invasive species control, and timber stand improvement. Accomplishments: 132 landowners implemented forest stewardship practices on 385 acres.

Result #3: Accelerate And Enhance Management On Public And Private Prairie Lands : Accelerated prairie management crews and private contractors were used to begin tackling a long-standing "back-log" of prairie stewardship projects on public and private land in priority prairie areas. Projects included tree and brush removal, prescribed burning, restorations and prescribed grazing. Accomplishments: Accelerated management was carried out on 128 sites improving the condition of 11,171 acres of native prairie

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The stewardship planning and accelerated management initiated in this project is being continued through several 2005 LCMR projects: (5a) - Restoring Minnesota's Fish and Wildlife Habitat Corridors/Phase III - Prairie Management, (5d) Prairie Stewardship of Private Lands, and (9c) - Sustainable Management of Private Forest Lands. In addition, the prairie projects (5a & 5d) are being complemented by a new federal program; the Landowner Incentive Program (LIP). LIP provides states funding to work with private landowners to benefit "at-risk species".

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Local Initiative Grants (Conservation Partners and Environmental Partnerships)
Subd. 05f    $512,000

Wayne Sames
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-1567
Email:  wayne.sames@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-6047

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The objective of this program is to foster public/private and intergovernmental partnerships by providing state matching grants to private organizations and local governments for "on the ground" fish, wildlife and native plant habitat improvement projects and related research and for avariety of environmental service and conservation projects.

A total of 39 grants totaling $406,513 were provided to private and non-profit organizations, educational institutions, local governments and soil and water conservation districts. Of that total, 24 Conservation Partners grants were made for "on the ground" fish, wildlife and native plant habitat improvement projects and research or surveys of fish and wildlife directly related to specific habitat improvement. The remaining 15 Environmental Partnerships grants were made for a variety of community environmental service, education, information, and conservation projects.

A number of habitat restorations were completed, including lakeshore, river shore land, wetland, prairie and oak savannah restorations. A number of tree and native grass planting projects were also funded, including a customized tree planting machine. Among the Environmental Partnerships projects funded were rainwater gardens, stream sampling, interpretive exhibits and signs, a Bluebird Trail, a bog walk project, a field study program for grade school students, a Lake Superior Coastal Reforestation Booklet, a natural resource inventory and management plan, and a land stewardship conference.

Since these projects are located throughout the state, many Minnesotans will benefit directly by having access to the project areas. Minnesotans in general will also benefit from information or research that may be applicable in many locations, such as the sago pondweed research or the coastal forest reforestation booklet, or from the habitat improvements that benefit fish and wildlife populations and help protect water quality. Environmental education, interpretation and information projects also help foster an appreciation for the need to conserve our natural resources, particularly for younger generations.

For more detailed information on any of the projects contact the DNR Local Grants Unit. A list of funded projects is included in the work program final report.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Minnesota ReLeaf Community Forest Development and Protection
Subd. 05g    $514,000

Ken Holman
DNR / Tree Trust
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-9110
Email:  ken.holman@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-5954

To protect forest resources, develop inventory-based management plans, and provide matching grants to communities to plant native trees. At least $350,000 of this appropriation must be used for grants to communities. For the purposes of this paragraph, the match must be a nonstate contribution, but may be either cash or qualifying in-kind.

Project completed: 06/30/2006 - A final report is pending


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Developing Pheromones for Use in Carp Control
Subd. 05h    $100,000

Peter Sorensen
U of M - Fisheries and Wildlife
200 Hodson Hall
1980 Folwell Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55108

Phone:  (612) 624-4997
Email:  soren003@tc.umn.edu

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The common carp (Cyprinus carpio) was introduced to Minnesota waters from eastern Europe just over a century ago and has been a problem ever since. This species of fish reproduces in great numbers, is robust, and has the habit of rooting in the bottom for food, thereby degrading water quality in shallow lakes and wetlands. The only technique presently avai lab le to control carp is a non-specific poison and barriers, both of which are expensive and ecologically damaging. This project sought to determine whether carp employ specific-specific odors (pheromones) to locate each other and if so, whether these cues might be comprised of bile acids, a class of compounds implicated in pheromonal attraction. Our ultimate goal is develop pheromonal attractants that can be used to catch and remove carp. Both carp and goldfish were used in this lab oratory study with the later being used for initial work because it is closely related to carp and more easily tested. We found that immature goldfish are highly attracted to odors released by their own species but not to odors released by six other species of fish we tested. Studies with juvenile carp showed them to also exhibit very strong, specific-specific attraction to conspecific washings. Biochemical studies next found goldfish and carp to both release cyprinol sulfate (CS), taurocholic acid (TCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDC), suggesting that while these stimuli may be active they cannot account for the specificity of the cue. Finally, two behavioral studies found that while neither CS nor TCDC is behaviorally active, TCA is weakly attractive to mature fish (especially female goldfish) and stimulates weak food-sampling behavior. We conclude that carp and goldfish release a potent pheromone which has great potential for use in control which contains non-bile acid components. A new LCMR project is now attempting to identify these component(s).

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Biological Control of European Buckthorn and Spotted Knapweed
Subd. 05i1    $109,000

Luke Skinner
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 259-5140
Email:  luke.skinner@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-1811

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results - European Buckthorn:
The purpose of this project was to continue the development of biological control for European buckthorn. The main objectives of this research were to carry out surveys in Europe for potential control agents, test the host specificity of selected control agents and to carry out a survey for insects associated with buckthorn in Minnesota.

Researchers surveyed over 80 buckthorn sites in Europe (Austria, Germany, Italy, Czech Republic, Switzerland and Serbia), collecting and identifying more than 900 arthropod samples (Gassmann et al. 2006). The community of specialized arthropods associated with European buckthorn, Rhamnus cathartica, and glossy buckthorn, Frangula alnus, is largely dominated by: Lepidoptera (22 species), Hemiptera (6 species), Diptera (4 species), Coleoptera (1 species) and mites (2 species). The complex of specialized arthropods is much higher on European than glossy buckthorn.

Nine insect species were subjected to host specificity testing. This included two stem borers, five leaf feeders, one sap feeder, and one flower/fruit feeder. Initial results eliminated three of these species (one stem borer and two leaf-feeders) for attacking a variety of buckthorn species, thus lacking the specificity needed for safety. Four of the nine species tested are considered high priority for continued testing as potential control agents. These include one stem borer, one leaf feeder, one sap feeder, and one flower/fruit feeder.

A total of eight buckthorn infestations were sampled for insect fauna in southeastern Minnesota. A total of 267 species representing 82 families and 13 orders were identified. Most herbivores collected were generalists and will feed on a variety of plants. There was no substantial damage to foliage found at any of the sampled sites. We surmise that insect herbivores will not interfere with the establishment of an introduced biological control agent. However, a large diversity of generalist parasitoids and predators were collected which potentially affect the establishment of a biological control agent for common buckthorn.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Results of this project will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and also in special publications and newsletters. Results also will be presented at national, regional and state scientific meetings to peers in the field, as well as to resource managers and planners who will use the results of this project. Current research will guide future efforts to develop biological controls for buckthorn.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Biological Control of European Buckthorn and Spotted Knapweed
Subd. 05i2    $89,000

Anthony B. Cortilet & Natasha M. Northrop
Dept. of Ag
601 North Robert Street
St. Paul, Minnesota 55155-2531

Phone:  (651) 201-6608
Email:  anthony.cortilet@state.mn.us
Web:  http://www.mda.state.mn.us/weedcontrol

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results - Spotted Knapweed:
An appropriation of $198,000 was provided to the commissioners of the Minnesota Department's of Agriculture (MDA) and Natural Resources (MN DNR) from the environmental trust fund to conduct research on two highly invasive plants, European buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica L.) and spotted knapweed (Centaurea biebersteinii DC), in Minnesota. The research outlined in this summary pertains to the spotted knapweed portion of the grant conducted by the MDA, which received $89,000 of the total appropriation. The work on European buckthorn is summarized in a separate report by the MN DNR.

Spotted knapweed is an exotic-invasive terrestrial plant that threatens the state's roadside, rangeland, agricultural, and grassland/prairie ecosystems. Minnesota land owners/managers are searching for less expensive and more environmentally compatible alternatives to herbicide use for management and control of this invasive weed. The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) released eleven biocontrol agent species in the state from 1989 through 2000 to manage this weed. Eventually biological control releases became the responsibility of the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) in 2000. Prior to the MDA inheriting the program from the USDA, few attempts had been made to assess the establishment and success of agents throughout the state to determine if biological control was a viable pest management strategy for spotted knapweed. This research grant was developed in an attempt to increase our knowledge of spotted knapweed biological control in Minnesota and to evaluate the impacts that bioagents have on this highly invasive weed.

Through this research, it was determined that six of the eleven bioagents released in Minnesota, Urophora affinis, Urophora quadrifasciata, Larinus minutus, Larinus obtusus, Cyphocleonus achates, and Agapeta zoegana, are established, have impacted the growth and spread of spotted knapweed on several sites, and are collectable for redistribution to new infestations in the state. Rigorous sampling of selected biological control sites has also provided the MDA with important information pertaining to the extent of spotted knapweed infestations, composition of other vegetation on infested sites, and various landscape, soil, and geographical parameters related to sites in Minnesota.

This research has showed us that biological control can be an important tool for spotted knapweed management in Minnesota. It's not the only tool, but it has the potential to have long-term and sustaining impacts on large infestations where herbicides and other IPM tactics are not practical, expensive, or ecologically unsound. Through this LCMR grant, the MDA has dramatically increased its knowledge of spotted knapweed in the state and the possibilities for extensive biological control management in the future.

Project Result Use and Dissemination:
The MDA plans to continue monitoring these biological control sites and delineating spotted knapweed infestations for new biocontrol sites. Sites will be added to their recently created geodatabase that will be used to track spotted knapweed infestations and biological control releases throughout Minnesota. This data will be used as a qualitative assessment for biological control agent impacts in the future.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Resources for Redevelopment of Brownfields to Greenspaces
Subd. 05j    $150,000

Megan Dobratz
MN Environmental Initiative
219 North 2nd Street, Suite 201
Minneapolis, MN 55401

Phone:  (612) 334-3388
Email:  mdobratz@mnh-ei.org
Fax:  (612) 334-3093
Web:  http://www.mn.ei.org

Overall Outcome and Results:
The Resources for Redevelopment of Brownfields to Greenspace project aimed to identify environmentally impaired properties to be redeveloped as greenspace, conduct environmental assessments and create/implement natural resources designs. The project exceeded all goals as over 16 sites were identified, environmental assessments were conducted at nine, and four sites received natural resource plans. Projects included wetland and prairie restorations, removal of invasive species, stormwater management through rain gardens and reestablished native communities. When completed, nearly 250 acres of idle land will be restored as greenspace.

The project advanced the redevelopment of nine properties that would have remained idle. These sites demonstrate the environmental, social and economic benefits of brownfields reuse as greenspace through onsite soil correction, cleaner air, improved water quality and enhanced natural resources.

Several communities benefited in both the metro area, and greater Minnesota. Converted from impaired land, these sites are now public parks, rain gardens and preserved farmland. All benefit water quality, enhance access to public space and provide years of educational and recreational space.

Through the project, roughly 375 acres were assessed, with nearly 250 acres restored as greenspace. Ten acres of farmland is preserved, over 85 miles of trails connected and water quality of the Mississippi and Chippewa Rivers and Minnehaha Creek is enhanced. Also, millions of public and private dollars were leveraged for acquisition, cleanup and implementation. MEI also secured nearly $15,000 of in-kind donations from project partners.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Information was shared through the Brownfields to Greenspace and Regional Greenways Collaboratives, MEI newsletters and web site, and project partners. Some sites have also had local media coverage.

Presentations include: EPA's Region 5 Nuts and Bolts of Brownfields Redevelopment, DEED Brownfield Workshops, Planners Network Conference tour - Ecological Restoration. Further presentations planned for the fall of 2005.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


Subd. 06  Recreation


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State Park and Recreation Area Land Acquisition
Subd. 06a    $1,500,000

Larry Peterson
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-0603
Email:  larry.peterson@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-6532
Web:  http://www.dnr.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The purpose of this project was to acquire inholdings from willing sellers within state park and recreation area boundaries. Approximately 730 acres in the following locations were completed using the 2003 LCMR appropriation:

    Crow Wing State Park - 470 acres (4 parcels acquired)

    George Crosby Manitou State Park - 220 acres

    Judge C.R. Magney State Park - 40 acres

This appropriation was significant in that it continued the progress toward acquiring critical private in-holdings within statutory state park boundaries. The Crow Wing State park acquisitions protect an additional 3 miles along the Mississippi River wildlife corridor in an area that is experiencing rapid residential development. These parcels will also preserve the natural views from the park facilities and helped facilitate the connection of the Paul Bunyan State Trail. The George Crosby Manitou and Judge C.R. Magney State Park parcels were acquired to protect lands within the Lake Superior watershed and offer recreational opportunities such as hiking (one mile of hiking trail included), backpacking and birdwatching.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Parcels acquired have been shown on updated state park boundary maps, and have been described in the Minnesota State Park Traveler newspaper and other publications.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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LAWCON Federal Reimbursements
Subd. 06b    $2,000,000

Wayne Sames
DNR
500 Lafayette Road, Bx 10
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-1567
Email:  wayne.sames@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-6047

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The objective was to use 50% of the money made available to the state from funds received from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LAWCON) for state land acquisition and development for the state outdoor recreation system and the administrative expenses necessary to maintain eligibility.

State Land Acquisition and Development (see work program for more details):

    • $419,531 for projects in two state parks and one state wayside, including a historic building and water tower and two non-motorized trails and an overlook for improved accessibility and safety.

    • $615,169 for acquisition of 510 acres in two state scientific and natural areas.

    • $340,000 for resurfacing of 10 miles of the Luce Line State Trail.

    • $150,000 for replacement of deteriorated finger piers at the Knife River Harbor and Marina.

    • $ 38,457 for redevelopment of a horseback and hiking trail in St. Croix State Forest.

Administration and Planning:

    • Completed the 2003-2008 State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP), which is required to maintain LAWCON eligibility.

    • Completed the 2004 Outdoor Recreation Participation Survey of Minnesotans, the first comprehensive statewide outdoor recreation participation survey since 1985.

    • Completed the 2004 Outdoor Recreation Facility Survey and Management Concerns of Minnesota Cities, Counties, and School Districts , the first time such a survey of local governments has been completed in Minnesota.

    • Completed 786 post-completion site inspections of previously funded outdoor recreation sites as required by LAWCON agreements.

    • Completed 26 conversion actions and 81 conveyance reviews (licenses, easements, leases, etc.) as required by LAWCON agreements.

    • Worked on 49 active federal projects representing grants totaling $5,312,496 and monitored 1,257 projects funded since 1966.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The SCORP was distributed to government officials; educational institutions; non-profit organizations; and individuals involved in outdoor recreation. The SCORP and related survey information is also available on the DNR web site. Presentations were made to park and recreation professionals and others through Minnesota Recreation and Park Association workshops and conferences, LCMR hearings, internal DNR planner forums, etc.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Local Initiative Grants (Parks and Natural Areas)
Subd. 06c    $2,579,000

Wayne Sames
DNR
500 Lafayette Road, Box 10
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-1567
Email:  wayne.sames@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-6047

For matching grants to local governments for acquisition and development of natural and scenic areas and local parks as provided in Minnesota Statutes, section 85.019, subdivisions 2 and 4a, and regional parks outside of the metropolitan area.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2007


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Metropolitan Regional Parks Acquisition, Rehabilitation and
Subd. 06d    $3,339,000

Arne Stefferud
Metropolitan Council
230 East 5th Street
St. Paul, MN

Phone:  (651) 602-1360
Email:  arne.stefferud@metc.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 602-1442
Web:  http://www.metrocouncil.org/parks/parks.htm

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Continue acquisition, redevelopment and development projects in the 2002-03 Metropolitan Regional Parks Capital Improvement Program that were not funded in the 2002 Capital Investment appropriation. Results are:

  1. Acquired 63 acres at Big Marine Park Reserve.
  2. Installed sewer/water service for 3 picnic areas at Keller Regional Park.
  3. Continued shoreline and trail rehabilitation at Lake of the Isles Regional Park begun in 1999.
  4. Rehabilitated 3 miles of park roads, 4 parking lots, replaced a restroom building, constructed 2 play structures for a picnic area and the campground, constructed 1 mile of connecting trails and walkways, and installed security lighting at Bunker Hills Regional Park.
  5. Rehabilitated 3.2 miles of hiking trails and 3 miles of bicycle trails at Phalen Regional Park.
  6. Reconfigured the parking lot and constructed 2 play structures at Theodore Wirth Regional Park.
  7. Completed 4 miles of trail rehabilitation at Cleary Lake Regional Park begun in 2000.
  8. Completed pavement overlay of 4.8 miles of bicycle/pedestrian trail in Mississippi Gorge Regional Park.
  9. Constructed a 0.5 mile bike/pedestrian trail along 49th Avenue in North Mississippi Regional Park.
  10. Reimbursed Three Rivers Park District for barn restoration and house modifications for agricultural environmental learning center plus entrance road, 2 parking lots, 3 miles of trails, 2 fishing piers and dock at Whaletail Lake in Gale Woods Special Recreation Feature.
  11. Partially financed construction of 0.6 mile of North Urban Regional Trail to address unforeseen soil problems.
  12. Constructed 1.5 miles of North Urban Regional Trail from Emerson Drive to the Mississippi River Regional Trail.
  13. Constructed walking paths and installed interpretive signs at the Mill Ruins Park portion of Central Mississippi Riverfront Regional Park.
  14. Prepared construction documents for 1.2 miles of North Urban Regional Trail from Dodd Rd. to Charlton Rd.
  15. Completed a 0.8 mile bicycle/pedestrian trail and restored 16 acres of prairie at Hyland-Bush-Anderson Lakes Park Reserve.
  16. Constructed 3 miles of new bike/pedestrian trails and rehabilitated 5 miles of the North Hennepin Regional Trail.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Public information on the outdoor recreation facilities financed with this appropriation as well as past State appropriations is disseminated in two ways:


  1. Through park agency maps, brochures, news releases and park agency websites.
  2. Through the Metropolitan Council's "Regional Parks" map/brochure and on its website http://www.metrocouncil.org/parks/parks.htm.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Local and Regional Trail Grant Initiative Program
Subd. 06e    $320,000

Tim Mitchell
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 297-1718
Email:  tim.mitchell@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-5475
Web:  http://www.dnr.state.mn.us

To provide matching grants to local units of government for the cost of acquisition, development, engineering services, and enhancement of existing and new trail facilities.

This project due to be completed equal to the period of any federal grant money received.


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Gitchi-Gami State Trail
Subd. 06f    $1,300,000

Kevin Johnson
DNR
1568 Hwy #2
Two Harbors, MN 55616

Phone:  (218) 834-6240
Email:  kevin.johnson@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (218) 834-6639

To design and construct approximately five miles of Gitchi-Gami state trail segments. This appropriation must be matched by at least $400,000 of nonstate money. The availability of the financing from this paragraph is extended to equal the period of any federal money received.

This project due to be completed equal to the period of any federal grant money received.


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Water Recreation: Boat Access, Fishing Piers & Shorefishing
Subd. 06g    $1,150,000

Michael Markell
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-6413
Email:  mike.markell@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-5475

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
This project's objective is to provide the public with improved access to lakes and rivers statewide. Access includes boat access, fishing piers and shore fishing improvements. Access opportunities are provided to people with or without a boat, to people of all ages, and to people with a diverse range of physical abilities.

Project results for boat access development included the construction of two new public boat access sites, one on Ross Lake in Crow Wing County and the other on Cedar Lake in Morrison County. It also provided for the redevelopment of four existing sites on the following lakes: Leech Lake, Cass County, Sand Lake, Pine County, Long Lake, Cass County, and Green Lake, Kandiyohi County.

Project results for boat access land acquisition included the purchase of property for a new public access site on Star Lake, Otter Tail County. It also provided the funds to purchase additional property adjacent to an existing access site on Star Lake, Otter Tail County to allow the site to be expanded and improved.

Project results for fishing piers and shore fishing were numerous. Fishing piers were installed on 15 lakes statewide with six in the Twin Cities metropolitan area and the remainder in greater Minnesota. Shore fishing stations were built at seven locations throughout greater Minnesota.

Minnesotans greatly appreciate and have come to expect adequate access to the state's lakes and rivers as evidenced by the large number of boats registered and fishing licenses sold. Minnesota is known nationally for its boating and fishing opportunities provided by its wide array of lakes and rivers. The utilization of these significant natural resources has become an important aspect of our states social culture and economic climate. Studies have shown that water access sites are for more than just boaters; they are used by birdwatchers, people who want to view the lake's scenery, or as a place to rest and relax. Fishing piers are popular places for children to recreate and to pick up a life long interest in fishing and the outdoors. Boaters benefit by having additional access to water through high quality boat launch facilities that are convenient and safe. Local units of government gain benefit via grants and technical assistance for providing new or improved access.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The public water access sites, fishing piers and shore fishing areas will be identified on the DNR's system of water access maps and the DNR website. Signs will be posted on each access site, fishing pier and shore fishing project giving attribution to the environment and natural resources trust fund.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Mesabi Trail
Subd. 06h    $380,000

Bob Manzoline
St. Louis and Lake Counties Regional Rail
801 SW Hwy 169, PO Box 627
Chisholm, MN 55719

Phone:  (218) 254-2575
Email:  bob.manzoline@ironworld.com
Fax:  (218) 254-7972

For the sixth biennium to acquire and develop segments of the Mesabi trail.

This project due to be completed equal to the period of any federal grant money received.


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Linking Communities Design, Technology & DNR Trail Resources
Subd. 06i    $184,000

Mary Vogel
U of M
141 Arch & Landscape
89 Church Street
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Phone:  (612) 626-7417
Email:  vogel001@tc.umn.edu
Fax:  (612) 626-7424
Web:  http://www.cala.umn.edu

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Recreation, natural and cultural resource protection, tourism, and community livability are promoted by designs for The Gitchi Gami and Minnesota River State Trails produced by a University-Department of Natural Resources-community partnership using design, computer technology, and community participation. It augmented the DNR's state trail work to create a whole systems approach to integrating state trails into community landscapes.

Goal: The study widened the effectiveness of the Gitchi Gami and Minnesota River State Trails as regional amenities by creating designs and graphic information that address recreation, tourism, preservation and development in trail corridors. The designs preserve, enhance, and interpret natural and cultural features in the trail's larger landscape.

Objectives:

  • Document existing trail landscapes

  • Project future land use patterns

  • Identify issues and opportunities

  • Create environmentally-sensitive designs and frameworks

  • Make community decision-making/implementation tools

Products:


  • Two reports

  • Enhanced Minnesota River Trail master planning

  • Increased knowledge of the larger trail environment

  • Generated enthusiasm for the trails by the 24 meetings

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The work is on the web. It has heightened interest in the trails, increased awareness of the trail's environments, and created a vision for each trail environment. County road and state highway projects in Beaver Bay, private development patterns in Taconite Harbor, and private development and public works plans in Lutsen have been impacted by the designs. Work has been presented to Highway 61 and Gitchi Gami Trail MNDOT staffers.

The DNR is using the Minnesota River work in its master planning. Flood protection, downtown revitalization, and public works projects in Granite Falls has been informed by the work as has planning by the Upper Sioux Community and Upper Sioux State Park. It has helped to create a confederation of interest groups in the Upper Minnesota River Valley.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Ft. Ridgely Historic Site Interpretive Trail
Subd. 06j    $150,000

Tom Ellig
MN Historical Society
32469 Cty. Hwy 2
Morton, MN 56270

Phone:  (507) 697-6321
Email:  thomas.ellig@mnhs.org
Fax:  (507) 697-6310
Web:  http://www.mnhs.org

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
This is phase one of a two-phase project to expand the interpretation and recreational opportunities at the site. The completion of phase one included the design, engineering and archaeological survey for 1.25 miles of new trails at the site. The topographic survey of the 20-acre site was completed as were all trail construction drawings and bid estimate documents. The archaeological survey for the entire 1.25 miles trail corridor was completed and yielded significant new information about the original fort parade ground. It also revealed the original fort parade ground walkways, which the new trail will replicate. Additional research that will expand the knowledge of the fort was conducted. This new information was added to existing knowledge of the site and both were used to complete text for 26 new interpretive markers. These new interpretive markers replace the 15 old ones and will expand and improve the interpretive story for the approximate 15,000-20,000 people who visit the site annually.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The primary form of dissemination for new material is through the interpretive markers. As site education and marketing brochures are reprinted, the new material will also be used in them. Discussions are underway to see if the results of this project can be incorporated with the results of other archaeological research being done in the park for a published document.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Development and Rehabilitation of Minnesota Shooting Ranges
Subd. 06k    $240,000

Chuck Niska
DNR
500 Lafayette Road, Bx 47
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 297-2449
Email:  chuck.niska@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-3727

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Twelve firearms ranges received grants, which were provided to make a variety of safety, sound abatement and access improvements, all on existing ranges. These previously established facilities were located across the state. All available funding for this time period was allocated, with 89.2 percent of funds actually used. Additional interest and need to participate in the grant program were shown by a variety of organizations that are currently receiving 2005-8 grant funds. Passage of the Shooting Range Protection Act did not yet impact participation in the program.

Archery projects were funded for the first time in this project period. Twenty organizations received grants, with a total of eleven new archery facilities being built. Seven were outdoor ranges, four indoor ranges. Four grants were provided for ranges on public lands. The third year of the project period allowed for both the project and grant program proved to be beneficial for archery participants, helping them to first see or otherwise realize the benefits of the program in year one, raise matching funding in year two, and make installations prior to the end of the project period. For the archery funding, 85.8 of the funding were used. A total of 28 organizations were provided matching grants. Overall, 88.5 percent of the grant funds were spent.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Information of the project results and accomplishments will be reported to the media using the Division of Enforcement information officer, and his contacts. Dissemination of information has been done through a variety of means, including phone and newspaper interviews, articles and press releases.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Land Acquisition, Minnesota Landscape Arboretum - continuation
Subd. 06l    $350,000

Peter Olin
U of M- MN Landscape Arboretum
3675 Arboretum Blvd.
Chaska, MN 55318

Phone:  (952) 443-1412
Email:  peter@arboretum.umn.edu
Fax:  (952) 443-2946
Web:  http://www.arboretum.umn.edu

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
A 90-acre parcel within the boundaries of the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum was acquired on September 22, 2009 by combining these Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund (ENRTF) funds with funds from a ML 2005 ENRTF appropriation. This particular land acquisition concluded a 25 year long process to acquire this parcel. The acquisition provides an internal connection to the Horticultural Research Center and adds to the Arboretum additional big woods, high quality wetlands, prairie remnants, oak savanna, and valuable tillable land for future research and education programs.

A master planning effort by the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum determined that, to a great extent, the Arboretum's watershed follows the surrounding roadways. By purchasing lands within the roadways, the Arboretum aims to secure approximately 90 - 95% of its watershed, control adjacent development, preserve a major part of the ecosystem in the Chanhassen/Victoria/Chaska area, and make the area accessible to the general public.

The Arboretum's planning efforts identified 278 acres of lands to acquire. With the 90 acres added through this project, to date, 241 of the identified acres have been acquired and 37 acres of in-holdings remain left to purchase. This progress has been made possible by $2.38 million from the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund along with $2.38 million in privately-raised matching funds.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Information about this purchase and the ENRTF funding support will be disseminated through Arboretum publications and through information resources at the University Of Minnesota.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2009


Subd. 07  Water Resources


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Local Water Planning (LWP) Matching Challenge Grants
Subd. 07a    $500,000    TF/GLPA

Dave Weirens
BWSR
1 West Water St., #200
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (651) 297-3432
Email:  david.weirens@bwsr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-5615
Web:  http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Grants were awarded to 14 counties, 2 watershed districts and 5 soil and water conservation districts to implement high priority actions identified in state approved and locally adopted comprehensive water management plans. The funds were used to complete the following projects:

  • Blue Earth County - A natural resource inventory and management plan

  • Carlton County - Provide educational materials on wetland regulations, best management practices and on the social and environmental benefits of wetlands

  • Carnelian Marine Watershed District - Protect, restore, and develop a watershed-based implementation plan for Silver Creek

  • Cass and Jackson Counties , Prior Lake Spring Lake Watershed District, and Stearns and Todd SWCD's - Develop and implement 12 lake management plans

  • Chippewa County - Develop a history of the county drainage system and an education program on the importance of drainage and water quality

  • Faribault SWCD - Develop a comprehensive drainage watershed management plan

  • Itasca SWCD and St. Louis County - Conduct water quality monitoring on lake carrying capacities for different lake types

  • Kandiyohi, Le Sueur, Meeker and Swift Counties - Develop an inventory of public drainage systems

  • Stearns County - Establish a coalition of lake associations

  • Wadena County - To provide cross-county collaboration on land and river management planning and implementation with Hubbard County

  • Washington County - Integrate groundwater into surface water management strategies and policies

  • Winona County - Revise the county zoning ordinance to control erosion and manage stormwater

  • Yellow Medicine County - Digitize drainage system information and inventory existing buffer strips

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Results of the specific projects are available upon request from the Board of Water and Soil Resources.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Accelerating and Enhancing Surface Water Monitoring for Lakes & Streams
Subd. 07b    $740,000

Daniel Helwig
MPCA, MN Lakes Assoc., Rivers Council, MN
520 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-7215
Email:  daniel.helwig@pca.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-8324
Web:  http://www.pca.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
This project was designed to enhance and accelerate surface water monitoring using a variety of methods. The condition assessment of 172 stream reaches was completed over two monitoring seasons. Monitoring was conducted in the Lower Mississippi, Cedar, Des Moines, Missouri, Red, and Rainy River Basins. This acceleration will lead to the earlier completion of the calibration of indices of biotic integrity (IBI) for all the basins in Minnesota. All data is available online. Over 10,000 lakes were analyzed using Landsat imagery for transparency over a 20 year span (at 5 year intervals). This provides a tool to extend the census of water quality data across the state and over time. Data from this project are available to the public online. MODIS imagery was used to monitor 100 large lakes for both chlorophyll and transparency. Hyperspectral and in situ data was collected at 37 sites on four river segments to develop a remote sensing tool for rivers. The Lakes and Rivers Monitoring Congress was attended by 325 participants. Fifty citizens, representing 14 groups, completed Monitoring Plan Training. Thirteen plans were developed and monitoring occurred at 153 sites on 66 streams and 80 sites on 56 lakes. With over 95 applications for the 14 openings, this pilot project showed a need for this type of training. The training materials are now available online for interested parties. Ten skills trainings, covering topics from data management to sample collection were attended by 71 groups and 300 individuals. Two editions of the Minnesota Water Watchers newsletter were developed and distributed to 3800 citizens. Healthy Lakes and Rivers Program trained 62 lake or river associations (423 individuals), with 39 Lake Management Plans developed. Volunteers in additional counties are undergoing training as a result of this successful expansion of the program.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Data from the biological monitoring can be found online at: http://www.pca.state.mn.us/data/edaWater/index.cfm. Data from remote sensing can be found at: http://water.umn.edu/lakebrows.html. Training materials are available from Monitoring Plan Trainings at: http://www.riversmn.org/resources_citmon.html. Monitoring Plans (13) and Lake Management Plans (39) have been used to initiate implementation activities.

Presentations on Satellite Remote Sensing were given at the National Conference on Enhancing the States' Lake Management Programs (2004), the Minnesota GIS/LIS Annual Conference (2005), the LCMR Southeastern MN Tour (2005), the North American Lake Management Society Symposium (2005), the Minnesota Water 2005 and Annual Water Resources Joint Conference (2005), and the MPCA Lakes, Streams, Wetlands, & Groundwater Team Meeting (Feb 2006). Presentations on the Monitoring Plan Trainings were given at the National Water Quality Monitoring Conference in May of 2006.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Intercommunity Groundwater Protection
Subd. 07c    $125,000

Amanda Goebel
Washington County
PO Box 6
Stillwater, MN 55082

Phone:  (651) 430-6744
Email:  amanda.goebel@co.washington.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 430-6730
Web:  http://www.co.washington.mn.us

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The primary purpose of the project was to develop a hydrologic model that can be used to evaluate the "sustainability" of groundwater withdrawals in the Woodbury-Afton area of Washington County.

The overall product of this project is a calibrated computer groundwater flow model of the major aquifers in southern Washington County. This groundwater model is a tool to predict the effects of proposed groundwater withdrawals (pumping) on: groundwater levels and pressures; water levels in existing wells; and base flows into Valley Creek (a designated trout stream). The primary impetus for this groundwater model is to predict the effects of proposed water-supply wells that are planned for the western portion of the City of Woodbury.

Additional products of this project include: GIS files of model parameters and results; a web site with interim products; model input and output files; and a final report (Barr Engineering and Washington County, 2005. Intercommunity Groundwater Protection, Sustaining Growth and Natural Resources, in the Woodbury/Afton Area).

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The groundwater flow model was used to predict the future effects of pumping of City of Woodbury wells 15, 16, and 17 on groundwater levels and base flows into Valley Creek. The modeling results suggest that for most pumping conditions, the reduction in the base flow of Valley Creek will likely be too small to accurately measure (within the range of measurement error). This small reduction in base flow due to pumping will most likely be limited to the south branch of Valley Creek, rather than the north branch or the main reach that flows into the St. Croix River. In general, the maximum reduction in base flows will occur in the summer months and will be about 0.5 cubic feet per second, which is about 5 to 15 percent of typical summer base flow or about 10 cubic feet per second. Flow from surface runoff would likely further mask this effect.

During extremely dry conditions base flows will be lower in Valley Creek (particularly the south branch) because of climatic conditions and regional pumping. The reduced base flow to the south branch of Valley Creek will likely be about 0.5 cubic feet per second. While this may not initially seem significant, this reduction might cause the upper portions of the south branch to have low or no base flow for a short period until pumping is reduced and water levels rebound. The model was developed to allow interested groundwater scientists and engineers can to the model to evaluate new information.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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TAPwaters: Technical Assistance Program for Watersheds
Subd. 07d    $160,000

James Almendinger
Science Museum of Minnesota-SCWRS
16910 - 152nd Street North
Marine on St.Croix, MN 55047

Phone:  (651) 433-5953
Email:  dinger@smm.org
Fax:  (651) 433-5924
Web:  http://www.smm.org/SCERS/

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The St. Croix River is highly valued resource with nearly a million visitors each year, mostly from Minnesota. It is impacted by agricultural and urban nonpoint-source pollution; consequently Minnesota and Wisconsin have agreed to reduce nutrient pollution to the St. Croix River by 20%. To achieve this goal most economically, resource managers need computer models of watersheds to test effectiveness of proposed remedial actions. The main objective was to model a sub-basin of the St. Croix to identify the most effective ways to reduce nutrient-rich runoff from agricultural land. This project established the Science Museum's TAPwaters office, which is applying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to the Willow River, a tributary that contributes nutrient pollution disproportionately to the St. Croix . The SWAT model is well accepted and used world-wide; however, we discovered critical errors in the model code. Correcting these errors greatly improved model accuracy. The significance to Minnesota is large, because SWAT will be used widely in coming decades to develop pollution reduction strategies. Whether changes in land management can achieve the targeted 20% reduction in phosphorus loads from the Willow is unclear from preliminary model runs. Completion of the Willow River model is scheduled for mid-November 2006. With funding from the National Park Service, work on a whole-basin model of the St. Croix will continue, thereby providing a nutrient-reduction tool for 3,500 square miles of Minnesota.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
St. Croix Basin Water Resources Planning Team of federal, state, and local officials is counting on SWAT modeling by the TAPwaters office to be an integral tool in reducing pollution to the St. Croix . Current results are critical to resource managers in the Willow River watershed for implementing remedial actions based on model runs. Results have been presented to over 500 attendees of annual conferences on pollution to the St. Croix and will be published on the web at http://www.smm.org/scwrs/.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Wastewater Phosphorus Control and Reduction Initiative
Subd. 07e1    $296,000

Ken Robinson
MN Environmental Science and Economic Review
400 - 2nd Street South
St. Cloud, MN 56301

Phone:  (320) 650-2812
Email:  krobinson@ci.stcloud.mn.us
Fax:  (320) 650-2830
Web:  http://www.meserb.org

RESEARCH

The technical approach to evaluate phosphorus removal retrofit options for the seventeen (17) selected MESERB wastewater treatment plants was based on the following objectives: 1) select cost effective treatment systems; 2) meet an effluent phosphorus target concentration of 1 mg/L (the most stringent effluent concentration specified in current MPCA regulations); and 3) have wide application to treatment plants in Minnesota. To achieve these objectives, the engineering analysis involved the following major tasks:

  • Characterize, group and select seventeen wastewater treatment plants from MESERB's 22 participating plants;

  • Identify and discuss a range of applicable phosphorus reduction and removal technologies;

  • Develop a protocol to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of phosphorus removal alternatives for the seventeen wastewater treatment plants; and

  • Identify the most appropriate cost effective phosphorus reduction strategies for the different types of biological treatment processes to meet a monthly average phosphorus discharge target of 1 mg/L.

Key conclusions drawn from this study included the following: 1) chemical treatment is the recommended phosphorus removal alternative for plants using trickling filters, rotating biological contactors or lagoons for secondary treatment, and for a given type of activated sludge system; and 2) the EBPR retrofit design and the choice of EBPR, EBPR with chemical treatment, or chemical treatment can vary depending on many site-specific factors.

The findings from this study were presented in a MESERB report entitled "Wastewater Phosphorus Control and Reduction Initiative" which can be found on the MESERB website at http://www.meserb.org and at the Legislative Reference Library. Two technology transfer seminars were presented at New Ulm and Brainerd discussing the results of the evaluation of phosphorus removal alternatives.

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Wastewater Phosphorus Control and Reduction Initiative
Subd. 07e2    $244,000

Marvin Hora
PCA
520 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-7201
Email:  Marvin.Hora@state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-7709

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency project had two efforts, 1) determination of the sources and relative contributions of non-ingested phosphorus which enters municipal wastewater treatment plants and 2) determination of the amount of all phosphorus contributed to waters of the state by point and nonpoint sources of pollution.

Phosphorous enters lakes and streams from both point sources (largely wastewater treatment facilities) and non-point sources (runoff from land areas). Statewide, under average flow conditions, point sources contribute about 31 percent of the total phosphorous load in Minnesota's surface waters. Sources are (from highest to lowest amounts):

  • Commercial/industrial process water (12 percent)

  • Human waste products (10.9 percent)

  • Food wastes (from dishwashing and garbage disposal, 4.2 percent)

  • Residential automatic dishwasher detergent (1.9 percent)

  • Commercial automatic dishwasher detergent (0.9 percent)

  • Raw/finished water supply (drinking-water additives, 0.8 percent)

  • Dentifrices (toothpaste, oral products, 0.3 percent)

  • Non-contact cooling water (which industrial sources discharge directly to surface waters, 0.2 percent)

  • Groundwater inflow and infiltration to sewer systems, <0.1 percent)

Statewide, under average flow conditions, nonpoint sources contribute about 69 percent of the total phosphorous load to the state's surface waters. Sources include (from highest to lowest):

  • Cropland and pasture runoff (26 percent)

  • Atmospheric deposition (13 percent)

  • Streambank erosion (11 percent)

  • Lesser amounts from non-agriculture rural runoff, urban runoff, individual sewage treatment systems and unsewered communities, agricultural tile drainage, roadway and sidewalk deicing chemicals, and feedlots make up the rest of the contributions

Phosphorous from non-ingested sources (those not passing through the human digestive tract) make up about 58 percent of the total amount of phosphorus entering municipal wastewater treatment systems each year. Making up this 58% are:

  • Commercial/industrial process water (27 percent)

  • Food wastes (16 percent)

  • Residential and commercial automatic dishwasher detergent (11 percent)

  • The remaining sources, including dentifrices, non-contact cooling water, drinking-water treatment agents, and groundwater inflow/infiltration, make up approximately four percent

Project Results Use and Dissemination:

  • The report is available on the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Web Site

  • 25 Full copies of final report have been distributed

  • 300 CD copies of the report have been distributed

  • 350 copies of the Executive Summary have been distributed

The report will form the basic source for future Legislative Policy decisions regarding phosphorus control in Minnesota.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 07/08/2004


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Maintaining Zooplankton (Daphnia) for Water Quality: Square Lake
Subd. 07f    $32,000

Leif Hembre
Marine-on-St. Croix Water Mgmt Organization
c/o Dean Tharp
14089 Oakland Rd.
Stillwater, MN 55082

Phone:  (651) 699-1045
Email:  lhembre@g.w.hamline.edu
Fax:  (651) 523-2620

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
High frequency sonar and conventional sampling methods were used to assess whether rainbow trout, stocked by the Minnesota DNR, adversely affected the water clarity of Square Lake via an ecological domino effect whereby trout consume Daphnia, algae are released from grazing pressure by Daphnia, and high algal concentrations result in low water clarity. Square Lake is one of many lakes in Minnesota stocked with rainbow trout. These lakes are valued both for their clear water, and for the recreational opportunity provided by the trout fishery. Understanding the impact of trout stocking on water quality is therefore relevant for the proper management of these popular recreational lakes. The fisheries management of the lake was altered between the first (2004) and second year (2005) of this study to assess whether a respite from trout predation over winter would allow a larger "seed" population of Daphnia pulicaria to survive into spring. The "seed" population was expected to grow and create clearer water in the spring and summer of 2005 than in 2004. Major findings: 1) Stomach content analyses showed that trout preferentially preyed on Daphnia pulicaria over the winter of 2004 and during the ice-free season, but to a lesser extent. When not subject to predation by autumn-stocked trout, Daphnia present at ice-out in April 2005 were much more abundant than those in April 2004. 2) The large over-wintering Daphnia population coincided with low algal abundance and very clear water (> 7 m) in April of 2005, but the Daphnia population decreased in size by late May and the clear-water state did not persist. 3) Average water clarity and algal concentrations did not differ significantly between the ice-free seasons of 2004 and 2005, and a demographic analysis based on sonar estimates of Daphnia and trout population sizes implies that trout predation had very little impact on the population dynamics of D. pulicaria.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Project results were presented to the members of the Square Lake Clean Water Partnership, the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, and the local community at a meeting sponsored by the Marine-on-St. Croix Water Management Organization and Square Lake Association on June 29, 2006 . A second presentation is scheduled for September 17, 2006 for the members of the Square Lake Association.

In addition, project results are being distributed to local and state decision-makers and citizens interested in the protection and sound management of Square Lake . Study results will also be available on the Web through L. Hembre's Hamline University faculty web page.

Aspects of this research have also been presented at two national meetings and are the subject an undergraduate honors thesis by Rachel McAlpine, a 2006 graduate of Hamline University (see citations below). The research presented at these scientific meetings is also the basis for a manuscript (co-authored by Maria Spitael, Miki Hondzo, and Robert Megard of the University of Minnesota and Rachel McAlpine of Hamline University ) that is in preparation for submission to a peer reviewed journal.

"Spatial ecology of predator and prey in a Minnesota lake." Hembre, L.K., McAlpine, R.J., Spitael, M.S., Megard, R.O., and Hondzo, M. Poster presentation given at the Ecological Society of America meeting in August 2005, Montreal, Canada.

"Diel patterns of patchiness in lake zooplankton." Spitael, M.S., Hembre, L.K., McAlpine, R.J., Megard, R.O., and Hondzo, M. Oral presentation to be given at the American Society of Limnology & Oceanography meeting in February 2005, Salt Lake City, Utah.

McAlpine, Rachel. 2006. Day in the life of Daphnia: An intensive acoustic study assessing the patchiness of zooplankton in Square Lake. Undergraduate honors thesis, Department of Biology, Hamline University.

In addition, this project was featured in two newspaper articles in 2004.

Project completed: 06/30/2006


Subd. 08  Land Use and Natural Resource Info


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Minnesota County Biological Survey
Subd. 08a    $900,000

Carmen Converse
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (651) 296-9782
Email:  carmen.converse@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 296-1811
Web:  http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/ecological

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
MCBS has completed surveys in 60 of Minnesota's 87 counties since 1987. In this biennium, field surveys were completed in Douglas, Todd and Otter Tail counties and in the North Shore Highlands subsection.

New records of 597 locations of rare species were added to the DNR Rare Features Database. Since MCBS began, 14,702 new records of rare features have been added. Since July 2003, 300 vegetation samples (relevés) were added to the statewide Relevé Database, for a total MCBS contribution of 3,519 samples of the 8,375 database records. Polygons of 1,649 MCBS sites of Biodiversity Significance and 10,161 polygons of native plant communities or complexes were added to the dataset that resides on DNR's "Data Deli". Statewide, MCBS has added a total of 6,142 site and 26,554 native plant community polygons. Canada rice grass (Oryzopsis canadensis) was documented for the first time in the state. Since 1987, MCBS has recorded seventeen species of native plants and two species and one hybrid of amphibians not previously documented in Minnesota.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Eleven MCBS county maps were added to the DNR website.

The first of a three volume series of field guides was published: Field guide to the native plant communities of Minnesota: The Laurentian Mixed Forest Province.

AniMap, an interactive web mapping tool, displays animals survey data collected by MCBS. http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/ecological_services/mcbs/index.html

Information delivered: Brainerd Lakes Area Conservation Collaborative, Morrison County Land Use planning, Lake County Land Department, St Louis County, Todd County Open House, county boards in Becker, Douglas, and Otter Tail counties. Participation in planning teams for DNR Forestry and Off Highway Vehicles.

Selected conservation actions: Participation in the Sand Lake/Seven Beavers and the Manitou Collaboratives. Natural areas recommended included Lake Christina, Mountain Mint Prairie and Spruce Hill. Part of a MCBS site in Crow Wing County received a DNR conservation easement; a prairie site in Kandiyohi County was enrolled in the Prairie Bank Easement program.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Updating Outmoded Soil Survey
Subd. 08b    $236,000

Greg Larson
BWSR
1 West Water Street, #200
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 624-3427
Email:  greg.larson@bwsr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (612) 625-1244
Web:  http://www.bwsr.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Outmoded soil surveys dating from the 1960's for Dodge, Fillmore, Goodhue and Wabasha Counties were updated and digitized to a modern GIS-compatible format. Further, the digital soil survey for Dodge County has been posted on the USDA Web site as a "Web Soil Survey". Fillmore, Goodhue and Wabasha Counties will also be posted to the Web. During the conduct of this multi-year project 1.65 million acres were addressed. Many innovative techniques were utilized during this project including the use of private contractors to collect field data and digital transfer of existing soil maps to newer aerial photography. This latter technique was developed at the University of Minnesota Department of Soil, Water and Climate with funding by the Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund. Updating outmoded soil surveys were part of a comprehensive effort by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service to update and digitize soil surveys in Minnesota . Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund funding directly contributed to the completion of the aforementioned counties and supported efforts in seven other counties.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
A survey of GIS users by the University of Minnesota concerning the most requested data layer suggests that soils data remains much sought. This project, and ongoing efforts elsewhere in the state, to increase the availability and utility of soils data will provide data essential to a host of natural resource management and land use planning decisions. The shift from static reports and data files of the past to Web delivery will increase the availability and utility of these data.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2006


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Mesabi Iron Range Geologic & Hydrologic Maps & Data Bases
Subd. 08c1    $115,000

John Adams
DNR
1201 East Highway 2
Grand Rapids, MN 55744

Phone:  (218) 327-4110
Email:  john.adams@dnr.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The project was successful and resulted in an ArcView database that houses a multitude of hydrogeologic data for the Mesabi Iron Range. The database contains 64 themes as shapefiles or tif images organized within 12 views based on data type: Base Layers, Climate, Elevation, FSA Photos, Geology and Aquifers, Mine Features, Report Maps, Streamflow and Watersheds, USGS DRGs, Water Bodies and Dams, Water Use, and Wells. Also in the database are 12 published reports in pdf format relating to the hydrogeology of the Mesabi Iron Range. Report maps were scanned and georectified and included in the database as tif images. To aid the database user, two index views exist: the Data Index, which includes 40 index themes, and the Report Index, which includes 12 index themes. These indices contain themes describing data and reports contained in the database. Another view in the database is titled "Theme and Data Table Links", and contains a schematic diagram showing links that exist between shapefile attribute tables and data tables.

Having hydrogeologic data and related information available in a single database in electronic format will be less time consuming and labor intensive, and more efficient for those needing data for water management-decision making. Now, it is no longer necessary to gather information and data from multiple sources each time it is needed.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The database is readily available on a DVD to mining companies, local units of governments, state regulatory agencies, and the general public. Database training sessions where DVDs will be distributed are being planned for DNR personnel, mining companies and other interested parties. Presentation of the database project will be made at every appropriate opportunity. It is hoped that in the future, information regarding the database and obtaining a DVD will be available on a DNR website.

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Mesabi Iron Range Geologic & Hydrologic Maps & Data Bases
Subd. 08c2    $131,000

Dale Setterholm
U of M / DNR
2642 University Ave. West
St. Paul, MN 55114-1057

Phone:  (612) 627-4780
Email:  sette001@umn.edu
Fax:  (612) 627-4778
Web:  http://www.geo.umn.edu/mgs

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The Minnesota Geological Survey (MGS) produced geologic and hydrogeologic maps of the Mesabi Iron Range-an area in which the land surface and hydrology has been profoundly affected by 113 years of mining. The maps are needed by government and industry to address issues such as community and industrial expansion, water use, and watershed restoration. Specifically, these maps and databases cover the eastern half of the mining district, and they complement maps of the western half of the range, produced in FY 2000-2001 with funding from LCMR. The map themes include bedrock geology, database, bedrock topography, depth to bedrock, and maps comparing land-surface topography, surface hydrology, and infrastructure between the years 1899 and 1999. The features that have been mapped profoundly influence the rate and direction of surface and ground water flow and documenting them is essential to managing water resources. Mapping is based on interpretation of water well records, mining borehole records, bedrock outcrops, and land surface topographic data. The records of approximately 800 water wells and 9,000 mining boreholes were added to the state-wide database.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The results of this project are digital files of drill hole and outcrop data, various map themes in a Geographic Information System (GIS), a Final Report document, and a set of map images published on paper (Jirsa and others, 2005, Lively and others, 2005); all available from MGS. Preliminary findings were incorporated into presentations for many organizations and mining companies. Future presentations and publications are certain, as this project is part of on-going efforts of the MGS to provide important geologic information about the Mesabi Iron Range to government, industry, and individuals. The historic maps showing surface drainage patterns circa 1899 have been particularly useful for watershed restoration and mine planning.

References

Jirsa, M.A., Setterholm, D.R., Bloomgren, B.A., Bauer, E.J., and Lively, R.S., 2005, Bedrock geology, database, bedrock topography, and depth to bedrock maps of the eastern half of the Mesabi Iron Range, northern Minnesota: Minnesota Geological Survey Miscellaneous Map M-158, scale 1:100,000.

Lively, R.S., Bauer, E.J., and Jirsa, M.A., 2005, Land surface topography of the eastern half of the Mesabi Iron Range, northern Minnesota, 1899-1999: Minnesota Geological Survey Miscellaneous Map M-157, scale 1:100,000.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


Subd. 09  Agriculture and Natural Resource Industries


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Native Plants and Alternative Crops for Water Quality
Subd. 09    $622,000

Linda Meschke
Blue Earth River Basin Initiative / U of M
426 Winnebago Avenue, Suite 100
Fairmont, MN 56031

Phone:  (507) 238-5449
Email:  meschkel@berbi.org
Fax:  (507) 238-4002
Web:  http://www.berbi.org

RESEARCH

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
Incorporation of crops that do not require annual tillage [3rd Crops] on riparian areas and strategically targeted uplands has the potential to improve water quality in the Minnesota River while providing economic opportunities for farmers and rural communities. However, information and incentives are lacking to accelerate the widespread use of these plants/crops in agricultural systems. This project examines farm production differences and the hydrologic and water quality differences among selected 3rd cropping systems and a traditional corn/soybean rotation in the Blue Earth River Basin. Key objectives are to 1. establish, demonstrate and evaluate plantings of native plants and 3rd crops for agronomic, water quality, and economic benefit; 2. determine economic and water quality impacts; and 3. accelerate implementation of native plant and 3rd crop production systems with demonstration, market identification, coordination and promotion.

Results include conversion of 271.9 acres of land, at 33 sites, in a corn/soybean rotation to a variety of 3rd crops; establish four 3rd crop demonstration sites in the Blue Earth, Chippewa, Roseau and Lower MN watersheds; establish and monitor research sites for agronomic assessment of landscape position on soybean, alfalfa and willow yield; establish and monitor water quality improvements from a 3rd crop system versus conventional system in the Elm Creek watershed [Blue Earth Basin]; hydrologic modeling indicating reduced peak stream flows in watersheds with 3rd crop systems; identified economic significance to adoption of perennial cropping systems for landowners and society; provided over 110 outreach events that reached at least 10,000 people; developed a book of stories about each 3rd crop easement farmer titled "Native Plants and 3rd Crops for Water Quality"; and established a significant outreach, demonstration, collaboration, and marketing programs that has significantly elevated the awareness, adoption and mindset for alternative cropping systems and their significance to agriculture, environment and community.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Throughout the project all project partners have worked tirelessly to disseminate information about native plants and 3rd crop benefits to the traditional agricultural system, improvement to water quality, reduction in peak stream flows, and the potential economic advantage for producers and rural communities. Over 110 presentations have been made by various team members across the state. There are many additional partners, who are not official project partners, who have contributed to the growth and advancement of an alternative crop mindset, beyond our original expectations, such as Green Lands, Blue Waters, Productive Conservation, Agroforestry Coalition, MISA, Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy, MN Project, Land Stewardship Project, MN Department of Agriculture - Sustainable Ag and Diversification Divisions, MN Dept. of Natural Resources, and NRCS ad the State Technical Committee.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2006


Subd. 10  Energy


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Community Energy Development Program
Subd. 10a    $519,000    OOC

Mike Taylor
MN Dept of Commerce
85 - 7th Place East, #500
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (651) 296-6830
Email:  mike.taylor@state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-7891
Web:  http://www.commerce.state.mn.us

Carlton Wind Turbine Web link: http://webapps.acs.carleton.edu/campus/facilities/Sustainability/wind_turbine/

Construction Photos: http://webapps.acs.carleton.edu/news/?content=content&module=&id=63797

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
There were two projects under the Community Energy Development Program - Clean Energy Resource Teams ($219,000) and Community Wind Energy Rebates ($300,000).

A. Clean Energy Resource Teams

The five LCMR funded Clean Energy Resource Teams each organized stakeholders in their regions (Central, Northeast, Northwest, Southeast, West Central) for 45 meetings/workshops over the project period (each region held 8-10 meetings). The meetings included the planning and the completion of regional energy resource assessments and renewable and efficient energy project prioritization. CERTs participants included citizens, businesses, utilities, NGOs, and government stakeholders. A statewide conference was held on February 28, 2005 where the preliminary results from the regional plans were presented (200 attendees, 36 speakers, 12 additional funding sponsors). The CERTs website includes 54 case studies, 12 technology FAQ sheets, 5 newsletters, and all of the final reports and documentation, which have also been published on CD-rom.

CERTs region project priorities:

    Northwest: wood waste biogasification; geothermal heating/cooling; biogas at food processing plants.

    Northeast: Energy efficiency and renewable energy in schools in each county.

    Central: Energy smart buildings, solar, local biomass.

    West Central: Community energy efficiency and renewable energy (biomass, biogas, wind) projects.

    Southeast: Wind energy development, transmission system infrastructure, energy efficiency, education, converting existing facilities to biomass.

B. Community Wind Energy Rebates

Carleton College (Northfield) and the University of Minnesota-Morris (Morris) each completed a 1.65 megawatt (MW) wind turbine in September 2004 and April 2005 respectively and are estimated to produce about 5,000,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) each annually. Each institution received a grant of $150,000 toward their wind turbine projects that was approximately 7-8% of total costs.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:

A. Clean Energy Resource Teams

As mentioned above, the materials developed were published on the website, CD-rom, and in limited paper quantities. They will be utilized in CERTs Phase 2 within the regions for energy project development and dissemination among the regional communities.

B. Community Wind Energy Rebates

Carleton College held a public dedication ceremony for their wind turbine on September 25, 2004. The University of Minnesota-Morris held a public dedication ceremony on April 22, 2005. Both wind turbine projects will report electricity production and financial information annually for 20 years.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Advancing Utilization of Manure Methane Digester Electrical
Subd. 10b    $221,000

Paul Burns
MN Dept of Agriculture
90 West Plato Blvd.
St. Paul, MN

Phone:  (651) 296-1488
Email:  paul.burns@state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 297-7678
Web:  http://www.mda.state.mn.us

A commercial 5kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell was successfully operated in February 2005 on anaerobic digester biogas produced on a Minnesota dairy.

An engineering team from the Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Minnesota and a cooperating farmer purchased and commissioned a production model PEM fuel cell on the 800-cow Haubenschild dairy farm in Princeton MN.

A water-scrubbing tower removed soluble carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide while retaining insoluble methane in biogas stream. A final iron sponge scrub removed residual hydrogen sulfide. This simple pressure and flow control system was satisfactory to clean up the biogas. Optimization will reduce the energy used for gas cleanup.

Caterpillar engine generator emissions were compared to Plug Power™ (PEM) fuel cell using biogas in both technologies. The greenhouse emissions from the fuel cell are minimal compared with the internal combustion engine. Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide (SO2) were less than detection limits. Total hydrocarbons (THC) were 1,790 ppmv or 14.5 g/kWhe. Average genset emissions at 103 kW were NOx = 2,963 ppmv or 25.5 g/kWhe, CO = 799 ppmv or 4.18 g/kWhe, THC = 20460 ppmv or 53 g/kWhe, SO2 = 277 ppmv or 3.34g/kWhe.

With assistance from the Minnesota Project and Minnesota Department of Agriculture, outreach efforts for the project consisted of 2 field days, 35 small tours, 10 formal presentations, and 2 papers presented at international conferences.

The primary recommendation to farm operators considering a fuel cell is to wait until the cost of fuel cells (currently greater than $10,000/ kW) is economically viable. The current pricing structure for electrical energy purchase by energy companies and co-ops does not provide enough income to farmers to make most operations economically viable. The value of renewable energy and incentives for making renewable must increase.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


Subd. 11  Environmental Education


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Dodge Nature Center - Restoration Plan
Subd. 11a    $83,000

Ben Van Gundy
Dodge Nature Center
365 Marie Avenue West
W. St. Paul, MN 55118

Phone:  (651) 455-4531
Email:  bvangundy@dodgenaturecenter.org
Fax:  (651) 455-2575
Web:  http://www.dodgenaturecenter.org

This project funded the development of an ecological management plan for Dodge Nature Center's Main Headquarters and Marie properties at 365 Marie Ave West, Dakota County. In addition funding was applied to continue restoration and land management efforts for the Nature Center's Lilly Property. The following projects took place on this property with these funds:

  • Staff worked to stop the spread of oak wilt through injections, trenching and tree removal

  • Prescribed burns were conducted on over 50 acres of prairie and savanna to control the spread of non-native and invasive species

  • Restored 8 acres of farm field and degraded prairie to native Minnesota prairie, planting 110 lbs of seed and 1800 seedlings

  • Replenished the woodlands, savanna, and floodplain forest with 30 lbs of seed and 2000 seedlings, to increase plant and animal diversity in these sites

  • Planted 100 trees and shrubs throughout the oak savanna, woodland and and other necessary sites (floodplain, trailhead, etc.)

  • Cleared and chipped buckthorn and honeysuckle from 20+ acres of oak woodland and oak savanna (also managed the spread of many invasive forbs throughout these sites)

  • Shrubs and trees were removed, on a continual basis, from over 25 acres of prairie

  • Reared beetles to control the spread of purple loosestrife throughout the Nature Center

  • Restored 75 feet of hiking trail and rebuilt foot bridge

Visitors of the Lilly Property will encounter four new interpretive signs highlighting land management projects that have taken place with the help of these funds. Curriculum has been rewritten to emphasize the restoration efforts at the Nature Center. A meeting was held for all neighbors of the Nature Center to inform them of the work that was going on and ways that they could get involved in the future. Finally, the above projects were highlighted in the Dodge Nature Center newsletter.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Bucks and Buckthorn: Engaging Young Hunters in Restoration
Subd. 11b    $255,000

Wiley Buck
Great River Greening
35 West Water Street, #201
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (651) 665-9500
Email:  wbuck@greatrivergreening.org
Fax:  (651) 665-9409
Web:  http://www.greatrivergreening.org

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The St. Croix Watershed Research Station and Great River Greening in partnership with Kiwanis Scout Camp and Minnesota Deer Hunter's Association successfully completed a pilot program testing archery hunting as a "hook" to get youth involved in the outdoors and engaged in habitat restoration projects, which together fostered a stronger connection to land. Over three years, 110 youth attended "Forkhorn Camp" and received Hunter Safety Certification. Over 30 youth with 40 mentors hunted on lands in the St. Croix Greenway Corridor each year; a total of 20 were first-time hunters. Hunters logged nearly 6000 hours in tree stands, and harvested 75 antler-less deer, 44 by youth. Youth and mentors participated in 13 required habitat restoration events. Three large events combined hunters with other conservation volunteers. Individuals volunteered over 480 times and put in nearly 1500 hours directly impacting 68 acres, including 25 acres of buckthorn removal; eight acres of prairie restoration; five prescribed burns; and planting of 400 oak seedlings and 3,000 prairie plugs. Youth and mentors also returned to the land for 14 eco-events including songbird banding, falconry, antler-shed searching, skull identification, small mammal tracking and radio telemetry. Science Museum of Minnesota staff used Museum specimens to enhance the ecological lessons of each event.

Over half of the participants returned in multiple years and expressed a sincere bond to the lands in the St. Croix Greenway Corridor. The Bucks and Buckthorn program exceeded participation, harvest, and restoration goals, and demonstrates an effective way to get youth and adults actively connected to the land.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Results were disseminated through: interpretive signage; informational flyers for large landowners and general audience; a feature Pioneer Press article; presentations to four civic groups and three scientific conferences; creation of a website (http://bucksandbuckthorn.com); and formation of a local MDHA chapter.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2006, as amended in ML 2004, Ch. 255, Sec. 47


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Putting Green Environmental Adventure Park: Sustainability
Subd. 11c    $132,000

Laura Gamm
Putting Green, Inc.
PO Box 91
New Ulm, MN 56073

Phone:  (507) 354-7888
Email:  gamm@newulmtel.net

Nine learning station and 30 bilingual interpretive signs with the message of resource sustainability were developed on a 9-acre site along the Minnesota River in New Ulm. The park is a "Living Lab" encouraging people to experience the natural river environment and southern Minnesota ecosystems through nine miniature golf learning stations, interpretive river trail and "outdoor rooms" featuring native plants. Community wide involvement in planning, design and building (youth, schools, business, local government, dedicated individuals and numerous citizen organizations) together with over $400,000 in donations and in-kind matching made this learning space a reality which opened on October 7, 2004. Putting Green Environmental Adventure park is a showcase of sustainable design and construction principles and practices, demonstrating the use of recycled and reused materials, renewable energy sources and sustainable landscaping practices. All elements of the park are designed as educational exhibits inspiring people to consider environmentally healthy choices in their own homes and workplaces.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 12/31/2004


Subd. 12  Children's Environmental Health


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Healthy Schools: Indoor Air Quality and Asthma Management
Subd. 12a    $168,000

Dale Dorschner
MN Dept of Health
Metro Square, PO Box 64975
121 East 7th Place, #220
St. Paul, MN

Phone:  (651) 215-0887
Email:  dale.dorschner@state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 215-0975
Web:  http://www.health.state.mn.us

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) completed a project to determine whether a school indoor air quality (IAQ) asthma management plan could be implemented in schools that resulted in measurable improvements. A Model School Environmental Asthma Management Plan (MSEAMP) was developed as a new tool to evaluate and improve school IAQ and its impact on asthma. The MSEAMP was implemented in 10 schools, six of which were re-evaluated after implementation. Improvements were observed in these schools.

Overall, 89 problem issues were identified at baseline 2004 compared to 62 at post-implementation in 2005. Specifically, in 2004, an average of 46 problem issues were observed during walk-through inspections in 187 location, which decreased to 35 problem issues in 141 locations in 2005. Also, pet allergen levels declined significantly: 70% of the areas sampled had lower levels in 2005. Moreover, staff perception of air quality improved in five schools, and to a significant extent in three schools where the proportion of staff rating air quality as average or good increased from 54% to 83%. In addition, ventilation rates improved in these schools, reflected in an average carbon dioxide level that was 159 parts per million lower in 2005. The findings indicate that school officials in Minnesota can implement IAQ asthma management plans that yield measurable improvements. Students and staff in the project schools now benefit from cleaner air. A summary report was completed and posted to the MDH website, which contains the same information described in the final work program report.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
MDH is currently promoting the MSEAMP and the summary report, which are available on request and at the MDH website. Email announcements and presentations will be completed, targeting building operators, IAQ Coordinators, administrators, and school board members. This information will also be presented to and shared with local, state, and federal agencies that have a stake in school environmental health. Findings of this project were published in the Clinical and Experimental Allergy, volume 35, pages126-136, and a case study was also submitted for publication in the Journal of School Health.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Economic-based Analysis of Children's Environmental Health Risks
Subd. 12b    $95,000

Pamela Shubat
MN Dept of Health
PO Box 64075
St. Paul, MN 55164-0975

Phone:  (651) 215-0927
Email:  pamela.shubat@health.state.mn.us
Fax:  (651) 215-0975
Web:  http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/children/environmental.html

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
The Minnesota Department of Health met with environmental economic advisors and collaborators, convened focus groups of Minnesota citizens, and designed and administered a survey to one thousand Minnesota residents in a two-year effort to learn the advantages and decision-making. Specifically, the MDH explored the use of economics in gauging public concerns about protecting children from environmental threats. The department learned the basics of environmental health economics and the limitations in methods of generating monetary values for reduction of health risks. The department found that the application of economic data is controversial (particularly when applied to decisions about children), but may offer useful information and explanation to support decisions that are made about public health protections.

The major work undertaken was to survey one thousand Minnesota residents about their willingness to increase protection from environmental causes of cancer to the public (adults compared to children) or their families (themselves compared to their children). The survey results indicated that adults were more willing to spend money to reduce risks to all children than to reduce risks to all adults. Similarly adults were more willing to spend money to reduce risks to their children than to themselves.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
The department will use this experience to critique willingness-to-pay data that are used by the federal government to evaluate and support risk assessment decision-making such as the risk reduction benefits of setting air and water pollutant regulations. The work will be considered and cited in department rulemaking for water and air contaminants.

Copies of the survey and the results of the survey can be viewed on the Minnesota Department of Health survey website (http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/eh/children/environmental.html). Future publications and meeting abstracts will be listed on the MDH website.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005


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Continuous Indoor Air Quality Monitoring in MN Schools
Subd. 12c    $300,000

Robert Schulte
Schulte Associates, LLC
9072 Palmetto Drive
Eden Prairie, MN 55347

Phone:  (952) 949-2676
Email:  rhs@schulteassociates.com
Fax:  (952) 906-1228
Web:  http://www.schulteassociates.com

Overall Project Outcome and Results:
This project used innovative fixed-base continuous real-time indoor air quality (IAQ) monitoring technology and the Internet to investigate and characterize the IAQ in 85 representative classrooms and other spaces in eight selected Minnesota K-12 schools. Potential IAQ improvement and energy cost savings opportunities made possible by the continuous data were estimated.

The results show that many of the project schools needed better ventilation, and several had school-wide significant deficiencies. They also demonstrate that a recent initiative by the Minnesota Department of Education to improve ventilation in schools is working. However, state efforts to encourage ventilation improvements and energy conservation are not being sufficiently coordinated. The schools are using project results to successfully and dramatically improve their IAQ. These improvements are often being done inexpensively using operating or maintenance adjustments, once school staffs have actual IAQ data that enable them to identify problems and measure results. Potential energy conservation opportunities in the eight schools totaled about $55,000/year, including relatively modest amounts of additional energy that would be required to remedy the discovered ventilation inadequacies.

This study has potentially major statewide and national significance. It represents the first time that IAQ in multiple classrooms in multiple schools have been monitored and analyzed side-by-side continuously and simultaneously for an entire school year. The project identified other recent studies that have found a correlation between inadequate school ventilation levels and increased student absenteeism. If such absenteeism study results are combined with IAQ data from projects like this LCMR effort, it could fundamentally change the benefit/cost equation for ventilation standards in schools. This project also demonstrated that ventilation and IAQ adequacy in multiple schools can be certified continuously from a single, remote location over the Internet. More detailed project results can be viewed on a website developed as part of the project at: http://www.mnk12IAQEnergyuse.org.

Project Results Use and Dissemination:
Project results and the Final Project Report have been:

  • Posted on a website developed as one of the project deliverables (http://www.mnk12IAQEnergyuse.org).

  • Briefed to the MN Departments of Health and Education.

  • Briefed to the National Association of Regulatory Commissioners, Energy and Environmental Resources Sub-Committee.

  • Briefed to two statewide meetings of the Minnesota Association of School Business Officials (MASBO).

  • Accepted by the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for publication as an article in the May 2005 issue of ASHRAE Journal, the leading industry publication in building ventilation issues nationwide.

FINAL REPORT

Project completed: 06/30/2005

100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Room 65 State Office Building, St. Paul, MN 55155