Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources

Menu

Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources

M.L. 1993 Projects

M.L. 1993 Projects

MN Laws 1993, Chapter 172, Section 14 (beginning July 1, 1993)

NOTE: For all projects, contact us to obtain the most up-to-date work programs for current projects (project updates are required twice each year) or the final reports of completed projects.

The following documents are short abstracts for projects funded during the 1993-1995 biennium. The final date of completion for these projects is listed at the end of the abstract. When available, we have provided links to a project's web site. The sites linked to this page are not created, maintained, or endorsed by the LCCMR office or the Minnesota Legislature.


Subd. 03   Agriculture
Subd. 04   Energy
Subd. 05   Forestry
Subd. 06   General
Subd. 07   Information / Education
Subd. 08   Land
Subd. 09   Minerals
Subd. 10   Recreation
Subd. 11   Water
Subd. 12   Wildlife, Fisheries, Plants


Subd. 03   Agriculture
03aBiological Control of Plant and Animal Pests - Continuation
03bCover Crops in a Corn and Soybean Rotation
03cIncreasing Utilization of Federal Cost Share Feedlot Funds
03dDemonstration of Production Scale Waste Collection in Aquaculture
03eRIM - Conservation Reserve Easements - Continuation
03fAlternative Aquaculture Methods
03gMinnesota Aquaculture Development Program
03hManaging Agricultural Environments of North Central Minnesota Sandy Soils - Continuation
03iNutrient Availability from Land-Applied Manure
03jEffective Manure Management in Conservation Tillage Systems for Karst Areas
03kNutrient Recycling Through Plants and Animals
03lDeveloping Soil Specific Nitrogen Management as a BMP
 
Subd. 04   Energy
04aReducing Energy and CO2
04bPhotovoltaic Demonstration Project
04cOperational Implications of Alternate Transit Bus Fuels
04dThe Bus, Bike or Car Pool (B-BOP) Challenge
04eTree and Grass Production for Ethanol
 
Subd. 05   Forestry
05aDevelopment of Tree Seed Orchard Complex
05bComo Park Replanting Program
05cReforestation in Ramsey County Parks and Open Space
05dDeveloping Quality Hardwood Forests
 
Subd. 06   General
06aMinnesota County Biological Survey - Continuation
06bMinnesota's Forest-Bird Diversity Initiative - Continuation
06cDescription and Evaluation of Minnesota Old Growth Forests - Continuation
06dMississippi Headwaters River Inquiry and Education Project
06eAnadromous Fish Monitoring
06fLand and Water Conservation Fund Administration - Continuation
 
Subd. 07   Information / Education
07aQuantify Pesticide and Fertilizer Runoff from Golf Courses
07bDeveloping Multi-Use Urban Green Space
07cK-12 Prairie Wetland Field Study Program - Ecology Bus
07dThe On-Line Museum: Computer and Interactive Video
07eEnvironmental Education Outreach Program - CANCELED
07fSummer Youth History Program
07gThe Ecology of Minnesota - Book
07hGreen Street: An Urban Environmental Awareness Project
07iMinnehaha Park Environmental Interpretive Center
07jNicollet Conservation Club Swan Lake Interpretive Room
07kProject City Camp: Experiential Urban Environmental Education
07lGranite Quarry Park and Interpretive Center Planning
07mExpanded Crosby Farm Park Nature Program - Continuation
07nMultiple-Use Forest Management Learning Kit
07oAn Outdoor Classroom to Improve Rural Environmental Education
 
Subd. 08   Land
08aBase Maps for 1990's - Continuation
08bRural County use of NAPP Flight
08cRecreational Resource Planning in the Metro Mississippi Corridor
 
Subd. 09   Minerals
09aMitigating Concrete Aggregate Problems in Minnesota
 
Subd. 10   Recreation
10aState Park Betterment
10bAmericans with Disabilities Act: Retrofitting Regional Parks
10cTrail Linkages, Metropolitan Regional Network
10dInitiate Gateway Segment of the Willard Munger State Trail Into Downtown St. Paul
10eBirch Lake Regional Bikeway/Walkway
10fCedar Lake Trail Development
10gState Trail Development - Continuation
10hShingle Creek Trail Improvements
10iLilydale/Harriet Island Regional Park Trail
10jComo Park East Lakeshore Reclamation
10kAcquisition of Palace Restaurant Site on Mississippi River
10lAccess to Lakes and Rivers - Continuation
10mSaint Louis River Land Acquisition
10nLake Minnetonka Water Access Acquisition
10oLake Superior Safe Harbors - Continuation
10pCooperative Trails Grant Program
10qAgassiz Recreational Trails (A.R.T.)
10rMesabi Trail Acquisition, Planning, and Development
10sRecreational Programming: Inclusiveness for Persons with Disabilities
10tEnhanced Recreational Opportunities for Southeast Asian Ethnic Communities
10uUrban Community Gardening Program - Continuation
10vNational Register Grants Program
10wHistorical Research and Planning for Traverse des Sioux
10xPeninsula Point Two Rivers Historical Park
 
Subd. 11   Water
11aMinnesota River Implementation - Continuation
11bLocal River Planning - Continuation
11cMercury Reduction in Fish - Continuation
11dStream Flow Protection
11eSouth Central Minnesota Groundwater Contamination Susceptibility - Continuation
11fLake/Ground Water Interaction Study at White Bear Lake
11gCounty Geologic Atlases and Regional Hydrogeologic Assessments - Continuation
11hSeptic System Replacement for Water Related Tourism Businesses
11iOptical Brighteners: Indicators of Sewage Contamination of Groundwaters
 
Subd. 12   Wildlife, Fisheries, Plants
12aRIM - Critical Habitat Match, Scientific & Natural Areas, Wildlife & Prairie Acquisition - Continuation
12bRIM - Wildlife Habitat Stewardship and Property Development
12cRIM - Statewide Fisheries Habitat Development
12dEstablishment of Critical Winter Habitat Areas on Intensively Farmed Land
12eWild Turkey Hunting Safety/Education
12fNiemackl Watershed Restoration
12gDeer Critical Habitat Survey - Koochiching County
12hRIM - Fisheries Acquisition for Angler Access and Habitat Development
12iEstablishing Goose Nesting Sites in Northern Minnesota & Relocation of Giant Canada Goslings - CANCELED
12jPrairie Ecosystem Restoration in the Minneapolis Park System
12kTheodore Wirth Park Tamarack Bog Preservation Project
12lBiological Control of Eurasian Watermilfoil and Purple Loosestrife - Continuation
12mReplacement of Eurasian Watermilfoil with Native Minnesota Plants
12nIntegrated Control of Purple Loosestrife
12oEcological Impacts of Releasing Genetically Engineered Fishes

Funding Sources: (**note: all projects are TF, unless otherwise noted)
Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund (TF)
Future Resources Fund (FRF)
Oil Over Charge(OOC)
State Land and Water Conservation Account (LAWCON)


Subd. 03  Agriculture


Back to top of page


Biological Control of Plant and Animal Pests - Continuation
Subd. 03a    $880,000 OOC

Dharma Sreenivasam
MN Dept. of Agriculture
Plant Protection Division
90 West Plato Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55107-2094

Phone:  (612) 296-1350

This project identified, developed, tested, and implemented biological agents in Minnesota, while focusing on effective integrated pest control with reductions in chemical use and energy costs.

  • Scientists from the MN Dept. of Agriculture, the U of MN, and Mankato State University participated in this project.
  • Seventeen separate research projects were conducted. Seven projects worked to extend the importation and establishment of natural enemies to must thistle, Canada thistle, cereal leaf beetle, gypsy moth, filth flies, and cabbage and broccoli pests. Eight projects utilized environmental manipulation for Brassica smoother plants, cocklebur, scab and verticillium wilt of potato, sugarbeet root rot, alfalfa pests, corn rootworm, or arthropods in commercial greenhouse productions. Two research projects utilized periodic release of natural enemies to control the European corn borer and insect pests of small grains and forage crops.
  • The research experimental design, methodology, validation criteria and application costs developed in the previous 4 to 6 years provide a solid base to refine the above projects for implementation treatments in recent years. The result from the 17 individual projects can improve Minnesotans' capabilities to protect human health, the natural environment, and surface and ground waters, while maintaining and improving food production.
  • This project is a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium: M.L. 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 6(a).


Back to top of page


Cover Crops in a Corn and Soybean Rotation
Subd. 03b    $150,000 MFRF

Dennis D. Warnes
West Experiment Station
University of MN
Highway 329
Morris, MN 56267

Phone:  (612) 589-1711

This project developed management strategies for using cover crops in a corn and soybean rotation. Wisely used cover crops reduce wind and water erosion of soil, improve water quality, and reduce the use of persistent synthetic herbicides. Project results include:

  • The researchers found that the cover crops must be planted before harvesting the corn and soybeans for successful establishment and growth through the fall and into the spring.
  • The cover crops were found to reduce or add nitrogen (depending on the cover crop used), reduce wind and water erosion of soil, protect and improve water quality, and reduce excessive dependence on synthetic nitrogen inputs.
  • When managed properly (regarding timing of planting and harvesting the cover crop), the cover crops did not harm soybean or corn development.
  • All research findings have been communicated to the agriculture community, through literature and presentations.


Back to top of page


Increasing Utilization of Federal Cost Share Feedlot Funds
Subd. 03c    $480,000 MFRF

Gerald Heil
MN Dept. of Agriculture
90 W. Plato Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 296-1486

Technical assistance was provided to 4 target areas to develop animal waste control facility (AWCF) designs to rehabilitate feedlots with water quality concerns. The designs met USDA-NRCS standards required to qualify for federal cost-share funds.

  • Focus group findings, within the project's "Feedlot Waste Management Study - Final Report," were used to develop guidelines and ordinances for the feedlot designs.
  • 107 pollution abatement system designs were completed and approved. In addition, the "Feedlot and Manure Management Directory" was produced, which helped to the educate of the public.
  • This project was extended for completion until 12/31/96.


Back to top of page


Demonstration of Production Scale Waste Collection in Aquaculture
Subd. 03d    $100,000 MFRF

Dwight Wilcox
Minnesota Aquafarms, Inc.
25 Industrial Park Drive
PO Box 592
Chisholm, MN 55719

Phone:  (218) 254-5736 or (218) 254-5733

This project was to determine the operational efficiencies of a production-scale in-situ fish waste collection system and evaluate the sytem's ability to meet state water quality requirements. The Minnesota Aquafarms facility was to be utilized as the test facility. This project was canceled in November of 1994 by the recipient.


Back to top of page


RIM - Conservation Reserve Easements - Continuation
Subd. 03e    $823,000 / $500,000 TF / $323,000 MFRF

David H. Behm and Marybeth Block
Board of Water and Soil Resources
155 S. Wabasha Street
Suite 104
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 296-0880
Fax:  (612) 297-7965

This project acquired perpetual conservation easements on certain marginal lands to protect and improve water quality, control erosion and sedimentation, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat.

  • 14 conservation reserve easements were acquired.
  • 943.7 acres of riparian cropland was returned to a natural floodplain ecosystem (98 percent within the Minnesota River Basin, 2 percent within the Cannon River Basin).
  • Returning the 14 easement areas to the native vegetative and hydrologic state has significantly reduced inputs of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides to surface waters, as well as provided excellent habitat to fish and wildlife.


Back to top of page


Alternative Aquaculture Methods
Subd. 03f    $230,000 MFRF

Ying Q. Ji
MN Dept. of Agriculture
90 W. Plato Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 296-5081

This project determined the capabilities of three different biofilter systems for utilization in recirculating aquaculture technology. The purpose of recirculating aquaculture technology is to conserve water via the collection and removal of wastes from the water systems. Project results include:

  • Three recirculating systems were successfully designed and constructed, including: a trickle filter system, a fluidized bed sand filter system, and a submerged thin film filter system.
  • Growth of the test fish species tilapia was low in all three systems due to several growth-limiting factors.
  • The three systems provided levels of water quality very similar to one another.
  • From the least to most expensive, the construction costs of the systems were submerged this film systems, trickle filter system, and the fluidized bed sand filter system.
  • A manual of recirculating aquaculture has been developed and many on-site demonstrations were conducted.


Back to top of page


Minnesota Aquaculture Development Program
Subd. 03g    $230,000 MFRF

Ying Q. Ji
MN Dept. of Agriculture
90 W. Plato Blvd.
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 296-5081

This program administered a grant appropriation process that funded projects which evaluate and develop environmentally sound aquaculture systems. Four projects were selected after and extensive review process.

  • The first project demonstrated the FIS-C Aquaculture Bioenergenics Model. This model studied waste load, waste collection techniques, and methods for optimizing feeding efficiency and effectiveness.
  • The second project studied ways to convert aquaculture wastes to agriculture inputs.
  • The third project compared and contrasted different aeration strategies for effectiveness and energy efficiency.
  • The final project developed a new feeding regime to improve the efficiency of food utilization by the fish.
  • Reports covering each project's results were made widely available through the aquaculture newsletters.


Back to top of page


Managing Agricultural Environments of North Central Minnesota Sandy Soils - Continuation
Subd. 03h    $480,000 MFRF

H.H. Cheng, Head
Soil Science Department
University of MN
St. Paul MN 55108

Phone:  (612) 625-9734

This project addressed water quality concerns arising from corn and potato production on sandy soils in north-central Minnesota by developing improved management strategies for water, nitrogen, and herbicide use. Project results include:

  • Current agricultural management practices in north-central Minnesota were evaluated by the Farm Nutrient Management Assessment Program survey.
  • Best Management Practices for corn and potatoes were improved.
  • Herbicide losses to groundwater through irrigated potato production were studied.
  • A hydrologic water balance computer model was developed to improve water management.
  • BMP models considering water and chemical movement were studied for effectiveness.
  • Extensive detailed reports, research and extension publications, and 5 on-site demonstrations were provided to summarize the findings and provide information to the public.
  • This project was a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium: ML 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 6(c).


Back to top of page


Nutrient Availability from Land-Applied Manure
Subd. 03i    $280,000 MFRF

Gyles W. Randall
University of MN
Southern Experiment Station
Waseca, MN 56093-1926

Phone:  (507) 835-3620

This project developed analytical tools to measure and predict the availability of nutrients-primarily nitrogen - from animal manure applied to soils. Project results include:

  • This project improved the ability of soil tests to predict nitrogen availability to plants, when the source of the nitrogen is previously applied manure.
  • Knowledge of the mineralization rate of incorporated manure on the release of nitrogen to succeeding crops was improved.
  • The potential impact of the time and rate of manure application on nitrate leaching were determined.
  • Surveys completed during the project have provided understanding of the current and anticipated future manure handling systems and manure utilization and nutrient management practices.
  • Knowledge gained from these surveys had contributed to the creation of Best Management Practices and the decline of harmful environmental impacts.


Back to top of page


Effective Manure Management in Conservation Tillage Systems for Karst Areas
Subd. 03j    $500,000 MFRF

John F. Moncrief
Soil Science Department
U of MN
St. Paul, MN 55108

Phone:  (612) 625-2771

This project investigated controllable factors (such as tillage systems and erosion control measures; manure and fertilization source, application timing, and rates) and uncontrollable factors (such as soil type and climate) that influence the losses of contaminants to surface and groundwater in southeastern Minnesota where karst and sinkholes are numerous. The project also evaluated the potential for land applications of poultry compost as a cost-effective disposal method for the southeaster poultry industry. Project results include:

  • The project's survey indicated that farmers have reduced off-farm nitrogen inputs significantly, and that ninety percent are following Best Management Practices.
  • Manure applications were shown to improve waste infiltration and reduce runoff.
  • The utilization of magnetic inductance resistivity (MIR) was evaluated for detection of the presence of residuum, glacial till strata, and loess thickness and limited success.
  • The Groundwater Loading Effects of Agricultural Management computer model was proven to occur predict runoff early in the season and under predict runoff late in the season and will need more validation of SE MN.
  • In evaluating the disposal of poultry, extrusion of turkey and chicken mortality was found to be viable as an alternative to composting. Artificial fertilizers, compost and turkey manure were determined to have the same impacts on crop yield and field conditions.
  • Educational efforts have communicated the findings of this project tot the public in the southeastern position of Minnesota.


Back to top of page


Nutrient Recycling Through Plants and Animals
Subd. 03k    $260,000 MFRF

Samuel D. Evans
West Central Experiment Station, U of MN
Morris, MN 56267

Phone:  (612) 589-1711

This project improved methods of manure use in West Central Minnesota; which has served to increase efficiency and reduce the probability of nitrogen and phosphorus losses to the environment. Project results include:

  • Soil nitrate-N tests to a 2-foot depth on manured and fertilized plots, either at corn emergence or at the 5-leaf stage, were fairly well correlated with corn grain yield.
  • Computer models were found to simulate various manure management scenarios, but did show some degree of error due to the year-to-year variability of the Minnesota climate.
  • Manure applications were found to reduce runoff, sediment, and total phosphorous during the growing season.
  • The shallow disturbances of the ridge tillage, method were more effective at containing soil and chemical losses that the deep moldboard plowing method.
  • The project indicated that manure testing produced fewer application errors and greater economic efficiency than manure utilization without testing.
  • On-sire demonstrations were conducted on 3 different farms to communicate the new information produced by their project.


Back to top of page


Developing Soil Specific Nitrogen Management as a BMP
Subd. 03l    $294,000 OOC

Bruce R. Montgomery
MN Dept. of Agriculture
90 W. Plato Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 297-7178

This project developed new soil specific, variable rate nitrogen applications that increased operating efficiency and reduced levels of applied nitrogen, without reductions in agriculture yield. The results from the utilization of the variable rate technology have illustrated the potential for immediate energy, fertilizer, and economic savings as well as reduced environmental risk. Soil conditions maps were successfully created which revealed nitrogen levels unique to the locations of the soil samples. Additional project results include:

  • The appropriate nitrogen application rates and desirable Best management Practices were determined via the newly created soil condition maps.
  • The variable rate technology, which utilizes the soil condition maps, discourages the tendency for over-fertilization, and thus, contamination of surface and groundwaters.
  • A Nitrogen Expert System, a user friendly computer aid, was developed as an educational tool to promote site specific, environment friendly management.
  • Educational activities and literature have further aided the new technology's acceptance and growth.


Subd. 04  Energy


Back to top of page


Reducing Energy and CO2
Subd. 04a    $230,000 OOC

Sheldon Strom
Center for Energy and the Urban Environment
100 North Sixth Street
Suite 412A
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Phone:  (612) 348-4669

This project developed and implemented cost-effective strategies which reduce energy use in the transportation, commercial-industrial-institutional (CII), and residential sectors, thereby reducing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other air emissions, dependence on oil imports, and the cost of energy. A database of current and projected Minnesota energy use and associated air emissions was developed. Cost-effective energy efficient strategies were developed which are targeted at energy uses that are most significant and amenable to reduction. An "Action Plan for Minnesota" was produced providing a clear direction for improving energy and economic efficiency.

  • Minnesota's greenhouse gas emissions were projected to increase by over 39 percent from 1990 to 2010.
  • Aggressive implementation of strategies presented in the Action Plan could produce over 36 million metric tons (MMT) in potential CO2 equivalent savings and create between 8,200 and 15,500 additional permanent jobs in Minnesota by 2010.
  • Implementation efforts were underway for the Action Plan strategies, within local and state governments across the state, as of June 30, 1995.


Back to top of page


Photovoltaic Demonstration Project
Subd. 04b    $230,000 MFRF

Patrick F. Quinn
ISD No. 625
Saint Paul Public Schools
360 Colborne Street
St. Paul, MN 55102

Phone:  (612) 293-5140

This project designed and constructed a solar energy demonstration system at Battle Creek Environmental Magnet School that has supplemented the existing public utility by converting sunlight directly into electricity using photovoltaic technology. The project has provided an educational tool for the Environmental Magnet Program of Battle Creek Elementary School.

  • The system has been producing approximately 11.5 kilowatts or 5 percent of the school's annual electrical consumption.
  • The information that has been, and continues to be, gathered from the system's operation has been made available to the public.


Back to top of page


Operational Implications of Alternate Transit Bus Fuels
Subd. 04c    $78,000 OOC

Aaron Isaacs
Metropolitan Transit Commission
560 Fifth Avenue N.
Minneapolis, MN 55411

Phone:  (612) 349-7690

This project compared the emissions, fuel economy, operational advantages and disadvantages, environmental concerns, safety, reliability and operating costs within a test group of 37 identified new transit buses. The buses were subject to differences in fuel technologies, including conventional diesel, conventional diesel with particle trap filters, blended ethanol, and straight ethanol. The buses were run through comparable transit services. During the transit service performances, emissions were tested; operating costs, reliability, and fuel economy were recorded; and the effort required to service, maintain, and repair the buses was observed and recorded. Study conclusions included:

  • Research concluded that ethanol buses produced higher emissions that the control group of diesel buses of the diesels with particle traps.
  • The life cycle costs of concerting to ethanol of CNG (compressed natural gas) were show to be much higher than maintaining the current diesel fleet, because of the need to retrofit fueling, fuel storage and maintenance facilities, and higher maintenance costs.
  • The 24 year incremental costs for ethanol and CNG were $248 million and $92 million, respectively.
  • CNG was found to be better alternative that ethanol because of the support of its utilities for maintenance and repair.
  • The study came to the conclusion that conversion to alternative fuels should be delayed because of the potential high cost and because no alterative fuel has emerged as the choice of either manufactures or government.


Back to top of page


The Bus, Bike or Car Pool (B-BOP) Challenge
Subd. 04d    $150,000 OOC

Richard Arey
Center for Energy and Environment
100 N Sixth Street, Suite 412A
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Phone:  (612) 348-2090

The Center for Energy and Environment demonstrated the evaluated the B-BOP Challenge to accelerate a strategy to promote Transportation Demand Management (TDM) program. The B-BOP Challenge was an employer-based, trial of service, TDM program designed to determine whether elements of the B-BOP strategy should be incorporated into the programs of the MCTO, Minnesota Rideshare, and other TDM agencies.

  • 14 companies and 1,294 employees participated in the project's experiment.
  • The 10 percent increase by participants in the use of alternative transportation modes appears modest due to the fact that those employees already utilizing alternative modes of transportation did not significantly increase their use.
  • Results suggest that future programs should be targeted to companies where alternative mode use would relieve serious traffic and parking problems or contribute immediately to other company objectives enough to justify the cost.


Back to top of page


Tree and Grass Production for Ethanol
Subd. 04e    $380,000 OOC

Edward G. Wene
Agricultural Utilization Research Institute
PO Box 599
Crookston, MN 56716

Phone:  (218) 281-7600

Tree and grass materials were established in an effort to develop future ethanol and thermochemical fuels through conversions of the biomass. The project achieved the following: recruited suitable sites and willing producers for the tree and grass production; trained producers and consultants in best management practices; developed low-input techniques and analyses procedures for productivity data; and, implemented a tree establishment plan.

  • 3,000 acres and 23 growers were recruited for planting.
  • Training was successfully conducted in site preparation, weed control, planting, and maintenance.
  • 2,200 acres were planted by the extended completion date of 12-31-1996.


Subd. 05  Forestry


Back to top of page


Development of Tree Seed Orchard Complex
Subd. 05a    $80,000 MFRF

Lawrence K. Miller
DNR Forestry
General Andrews Nursery
P.O. Box 95
Willow River, MN 55795

Phone:  (218) 372-3183

A DNR-acquired farm site near Moose Lake, MN, was utilized to further the goals of the tree improvement program by producing genetically-improved tree seedlings.

  • 2 seed orchards were established to eventually produce genetically-improved seed for the state nursery program: a first generation northern red oak orchard and a second generation black spruce orchard.
  • The orchards have been, and will continue to be, intensively managed for efficiency and effectiveness.
  • The orchards have been designed to produce seed superior in growth rate, form, wood quality, and/or pest resistance.


Back to top of page


Como Park Replanting Program
Subd. 05b    $93,000 MFRF

John Wirka
City of Saint Paul
25 W. Fourth St., Rom 300
St. Paul, MN 55102

Phone:  (612) 292-7400

This project implemented a plan for replanting areas in Como Park which have lost trees due to disease, age, or other causes. The additional plantings have strengthened the native plant communities in the park and improved visitors' recreational experiences.

  • A project plan was prepared incorporating 35 different species of native Minnesota trees.
  • 658 trees were planted throughout the park.


Back to top of page


Reforestation in Ramsey County Parks and Open Space
Subd. 05c    $50,000 MFRF

Larry E. Holmberg
Ramsey County Parks and Recreation Dept.
2015 N. Van Dyke St.
Maplewood, MN 55109

Phone:  (612) 777-0393

This project provided an accelerated reforestation program in Ramsey County regional and county parks to replace trees lost to storm damage, drought, disease, or other causes. In addition, plans progressed toward new plantings.

  • Approximately 15,500 coniferous and deciduous trees were planted within 8 separate parks.
  • The mortality rate of the plantings was very low, due to proper maintenance practices and favorable rainfall.


Back to top of page


Developing Quality Hardwood Forests
Subd. 05d    $210,000 MFRF

Melvin J. Baughman
U of MN
Dept. of Forest Resources
1530 N. Cleveland Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55108

Phone:  (612) 624-0734

This project assessed the relationship between canopy gap characteristics and stand development; measured the effects of site preparation and crown closure on red oak regeneration; and conducted an educational program on hardwood forest management. Results of the project's experimentation included:

  • Red oak regeneration in canopy gap was affected by gap age, area, aspect, upper-slope steepness, presence/absence of a root restricting zone within 32 inches below the ground surface, the soil's A:E horizon sand ratio, and amount of advance regeneration prior to harvest.
  • Leaf shape was successfully used to differentiate northern pin oak trees from northern red oak trees and hybrids.
  • Acorn numbers were found to be higher in understory and shelterwood sites that in clearcut sites, but the combined influence of dispersal, predation, and microsite result in greater likelihood of germination and early survival than in understory sites. In all overstory treatments, burning had a positive impact on acorn numbers, germination and early establishment.
  • Planted red oak seedlings were found to be larger in plots treated with herbicides than in plots receiving mechanical or no understory treatments.
  • Oak seedlings with large root systems grew larger than nursery run seedlings.
  • Tree shelters, encouraged seedling height, but not diameter.
  • 110 educational events on forestry subjects were conducted reaching over 900 woodland owners and loggers, 2,500 youth and educators, and 1650 other adults.
  • The knowledge gained from this project can help forest mangers, learn to better assess the red oak regeneration potential of a site and adapt the harvest, site preparation, or planting practices to more successfully regenerate oak.


Subd. 06  General


Back to top of page


Minnesota County Biological Survey - Continuation
Subd. 06a    $900,000 TF

Carmen Converse
Natural Heritage Program
Dept. of Natural Resources
500 Lafayette Road, Box 7
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-9782

The Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS) collected biological information on the distribution and status of rare plants, rare animals, and natural communities. The ecological data collected was entered into the National Heritage Information System.

  • Surveys were completed in Cass, Dakota, Houston, and Winona Counties, and begun in Fillmore, Mahnomen, Olmsted, Pine, and Wabasha Counties.
  • 2636 rare features were identified and recorded.
  • MCBS results have been utilized for environmental review, forest and wildlife planning, urban and recreational development planning, nature preserve acquisition, and public education.
  • This was a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium; M.L. 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 9(d). The survery continues as part of the 1995-1997 biennium; M.L. 1995, Ch. 220, Sec. 19, Subd. 7(c).


Back to top of page


Minnesota's Forest-Bird Diversity Initiative - Continuation
Subd. 06b    $500,000 TF

Lee Pfannmuller
MN Dept. of Natural Resources, Division of Fish and
Wildlife
500 Lafayette Road, Box 25
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-0783

The DNR implemented the monitoring program that began in the fiscal year 1992-93, continued work to assess the relationship of forest birds to landscape patterns and composition, and promoted forest bird conservation and management. Forest birds are good indicators of diversity since they comprise 70% of all forest vertebrates. The state lies in a narrow forest belt that supports a greater diversity of songbirds than anywhere else in north America.

  • The project is collecting data on the presence and abundance of forest birds through a network of over 1,000 sampling points distributed across the northern forest region.
  • Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques are used to correlate bird population data with regional forest cover and land use information and to develop predictive models that assess the impact of future forest change.
  • The knowledge gathered is being applied to the development of forest management tools that integrate the diverse habitat needs of forest bird.
  • Results have been disseminated through presentation, technical papers, publications, films, and the like.

The project is a continuation form the 1991-1993 biennium; ML 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 9(o) and is being continued in the 1995-1997 biennium; ML 1999, Ch. 220, Sec. 19, Subd. 76(d) and is designated as a 10-15 year monitoring effort.


Back to top of page


Description and Evaluation of Minnesota Old Growth Forests - Continuation
Subd. 06c    $250,000 MFRF

Kurt A. Rusterholz
Natural Heritage Program
DNR, Box 7
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-7265

The DNR accelerated the evaluation of DNR old-growth candidate stands, developed detailed descriptions of old-growth examples of three forest types; and, characterized the ecotropic mycorrhizal fungi found in important old-growth forest types.

  • 449 DNR old-growth candidate stand were sampled during the project.
  • Of the 449 stands, 415 were formally evaluated and recommended for protection or release.
  • 51 forest stands of three forest types: maple-basswood, oak, and black ask swamp were sampled for species and structural composition.
  • Mycorrhizal fungi fruiting bodies (mushrooms) were quantitatively surveyed in two old-growth forest stands. Higher mushroom species richness was found in the old-growth forests for eastern North America, and will provide baseline data for environmental monitoring of forest health.
  • The results of the old-growth stand evaluations have been used by the DNR to identify which candidate stand will be protected as old-growth.


Back to top of page


Mississippi Headwaters River Inquiry and Education Project
Su6(d)    $75,000 MFRF

Molly MacGregor
DNR
Mississippi Headwaters Board
Cass County Courthouse
Walker, Mn 56484

Phone:  (218) 547-3300, Ext. 263

This project assessed and investigated the natural, cultural, scenic, scientific, and recreational values of the first 400 miles of the Mississippi River. A program of management guidelines for private property owners and local land use decision makers was developed, based on geographically homogeneous regions of the Mississippi Headwaters.

  • Biological species and habitat were assessed, sampled, and analyzed.
  • Literature was reviewed and collected for information on archaeology and cultural history, while fisheries managers were surveyed for input regarding fish habitat, community characteristics, and management concerns.
  • The River Protection Manual was produced, summarizing research, value assessments, and management guidelines, with approximately 2,000 copies in print as of June 30, 1995.


Back to top of page


Anadromous Fish Monitoring
Subd. 06e    $137,000 MFRF

Mark Ebbers
DNR, Section of Fisheries
Box 12, 500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-2804
This project provided biologic monitoring to improve the management of the steelhead trout population on the north shore of Lake Superior.

  • An anadromous fish monitoring device was constructed on the Knife River.
  • The trap was designed to provide information on riverine and lake survival, growth, run timing, predator/prey responses, and the effects of planned or accidental species introductions.


Back to top of page


Land and Water Conservation Fund Administration - Continuation
Subd. 06f    $80,000 MFRF

William H. Becker
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4010
Phone:  (612) 296-3093

This project administered the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund grant program to maximize federal receipts and ensure Minnesota's continuing eligibility to participate. Grants reimbursements were deposited into the federal reimbursement account as rapidly as possible. In addition, the "pass through" appropriations were administered by this project through the Department of Natural Resources for the benefit of nonstate entities.

  • 28 "pass throughs" were successfully administered.
  • The grant activities involved approximately $8.1 million of LCMR appropriations.
  • $494,059 was captured and deposited during the biennium, while an additional $316,812 was made available for recreation projects.
  • This project was a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium; M.L. 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 3(i).


Subd. 07  Information / Education


Back to top of page


Quantify Pesticide and Fertilizer Runoff from Golf Courses
Subd. 07a    $49,000 MFRF / $49,000 Nonstate Match

John M. Barten
Suburban Hennepin Regional Park District
3800 County Road 24
Maple Plain, MN 55359

Phone:  (612) 476-4663

This study monitored surface runoff from representative gold golf courses and assessed the impact of contaminants on downstream waterbodies. Study results include:

67 rainfall runoff samples were collected from 4 golf courses' runoff were higher than the concentrations normally found in typical urban residential area runoff. The mean phosphorous and nitrogen export rates were 0.13 lb/acre and 1.54lb/acre, respectively, because runoff volume at the golf course was only 6 percent of the total rainfall.

Detectable concentration of fungicides were observed in 60 percent of the samples; however, only less than 0.2 percent of the fungicides applied to the golf courses was exported with runoff water.

The study indicated that golf courses are not a significant source of nutrient loading to adjacent waterbodies, and are actually very similar in phosphorous export rates to open areas.

This project's results will be used to assist counties and the DNR with review of new gold course construction permits. Reports have been provided to golf course superintendents, and other groups involved in golf course review and management. Research results are being published scientific journals.


Back to top of page


Developing Multi-Use Urban Green Space
Subd. 07b    $220,000 MFRF

Alan Singer
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
310 Fourth Avenue S.
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:  (612) 348-2222

During this project 7 plots were designed and constructed demonstrating ecologically-sound lawncare techniques and landscaping alternatives. Neighborhood and community residents were involved in community gardening.

  • 2 urban tree nurseries and orchards were developed.
  • 30 deciduous plantings were made to begin a transition to the once-present Big Woods community and serve as a future seed-producing location.
  • The project has effectively beautified the individual neighborhoods and increased community involvement with sustainable development.


Back to top of page


K-12 Prairie Wetland Field Study Program - Ecology Bus
Subd. 07c    $270,000 MFRF

Larry Granger
Heron Lake Environmental Learning Center
PO Box 429
Lakefield, MN 56150-0429

Phone:  (507) 662-5064

A retrofitted transit bus was equiped as a mobile teaching station and science lab to provide an interdisciplinary environmental education program in Southwest Minnesota. The mobile teaching station served 39 schools during the 1993-95 biennium.

  • The integrated design of the bus and its equipment have created a portable classroom that provides students access to a wide range of outdoor locations.
  • The Naturalist-Driver position combined instructive teaching with the vehicle's operation.
  • The Ecology Bus utilized soy diesel as fuel, and effectively served as an example to the counties visited.


Back to top of page


The On-Line Museum: Computer and Interactive Video
Subd. 07d    $260,000 TF

Orrin C. Shane, III
Science Museum of MN
30 E. Tenth Street
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (612) 221-9436

A computer-assisted museum specimen catalogue system was created. With this system specimen images and scientific data can be integrated into a museum collections database. The system is completely digital, allowing rapid editing and updating of catalogue information and efficient dissemination of information to scholars, students, and museum visitors.


Back to top of page


CANCELED - Environmental Education Outreach Program
Subd. 07e    $215,000 MFRF / $215,000 Nonstate Match (Required match not met)

Pauline Langsdorf
Metropolitan Waste Control Commission
230 E. Fifth Street
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (612) 229-2100

This project will develop a multidisciplinary environmental science and math curriculum for grades K- 12 and team-taught by private sector volunteers, teachers, and Metropolitan Waste Control Commission volunteer staff. This project requires a non-state match of $215,000.


Back to top of page


Summer Youth History Program
Subd. 07f    $100,000 MFRF

Ian Stewart
Minnesota Historical Society
345 W. Kellogg Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55102-1906

Phone:  (612) 297-5513

This program provided educational and employment opportunities to high school age youth at the Minnesota History Center or State Historical Sites. The program increased institutional awareness of the Minnesota Historical Society among diverse communities throughout the state and expanded the Society's programs for youth.

  • The program employed 59 student interns.
  • Minority and disadvantaged students accounted for 68 percent of the summer interns.
  • 12 interns were employed by the Society after the program's conclusion.


Back to top of page


The Ecology of Minnesota - Book
Subd. 07g    $51,000 MFRF

Barbara Coffin
U of MN
University of Minnesota Press
2037 University Ave SE
Minneapolis, MN 55414

Phone:  (612) 624-7368

This project created a book that provides a comprehensive overview of Minnesota's natural environment. The book was designed to present information in full-color graphics at the high school, college, and general public levels of understanding.

  • The book, written by John Tester, was titled "Minnesota's Natural Heritage: An Ecological Perspective."
  • 130 color photographs and 57 illustrations provide a clear, user-friendly, up-to-date, informational literature source for those concerned with the natural environment.
  • Approximately 15,000 copies of the book were sold as of June 30, 1995.


Back to top of page


Green Street: An Urban Environmental Awareness Project
Subd. 07h    $550,000 TF

Patrick L. Hamilton
Geography Department
Science Museum of MN
30 E. Tenth St.
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (612) 221-9432

The Science Museum of Minnesota developed the Green Street exhibit which communicates the links between modern lifestyles and major environmental issues. Visitors to the exhibit are encouraged to act on the information provided them in ways that reduce their impacts on the environment.

  • 69, 654 students and teachers have been impacted by the exhibit.
  • Green Street has become a site of theater performances, demonstrations, services, and laboratory activities that seek to further environmental awareness and action.


Back to top of page


Minnehaha Park Environmental Interpretive Center
Subd. 07i    $300,000 TF / $37,000 NONSTATE MATCH

Sandra S. Welsh
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
200 Grain Exchange
400 South Fourth St.
Minneapolis, MN 55415-1400

Phone:  (612) 661-4821

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board renovated the historic Longfellow House in Minnehaha Park to accommodate an environmental interpretive program.

  • The historic building was relocated from Minnehaha Parkway to Minnehaha Avenue (approximately 600 feet) and now meets A.D.A. requirements.


Back to top of page


Nicollet Conservation Club Swan Lake Interpretive Room
Subd. 07j    $18,000 MFRF / $18,000 NONSTATE MATCH

Fred L. Froehlich
Nicollet Conservation Club
PO Box 187
Nicollet, MN 56074

Phone:  (507) 225-3843

This project equipped an interpretive center at the Nicollet Conservation Club. The center has been opened for use by local school groups and government entities for interpretive programs and meetings at no charge.

  • The interpretive center has increased public appreciation of wetland ecology, wildlife, cultural resource values, and restoration efforts.
  • By the conclusion of the project's biennium, over 140 children had utilized the center's educational displays, equipment, and programs.


Back to top of page


Project City Camp: Experiential Urban Environmental Education
Subd. 07k    $130,000 MFRF

Steven M. Gustafson
Pillsbury Neighborhood Services, Inc.
1701 Oak Park Avenue N.
Minneapolis, MN 55411

Phone:  (612) 377-7000

This project designed an educational program to provide city youth focused experiences to help increase understanding of the urban environment and its impact on human development.

  • The intensive educational program was involved 270 urban teens and adults using the "City Camp" model.
  • Transportation, water, food, energy, communications, waste management, and economics were systems studied within the program.
  • Neighborhood environmental quality maps and a three-dimensional model of Minneapolis were created for environmental education outreach.


Back to top of page


Granite Quarry Park and Interpretive Center Planning
Subd. 07l    $50,000 MFRF / $50,000 NONSTATE MATCH

Charles Wocken
Stearns County parks
425 S. 72nd Avenue
St. Cloud, MN 56301

Phone:  (612) 255-6172

Granite Quarry Park was extensively studied to collect information on the park's geological, ecological, biological, and cultural resources.

  • The park site analysis was completed during the project's biennium.
  • A Master Plan, which maps the cultural and physical features of the park, was developed from the research results.


Back to top of page


Expanded Crosby Farm Park Nature Program - Continuation
Subd. 07m    $91,000 MFRF

Ed Olsen
Division of Parks and Recreation, City of Saint Paul
1224 N. Lexington Parkway
St. Paul, MN 55103

Phone:  (612) 488-7291

Park facilities in St. Paul were utilized to expand educational opportunities regarding Minnesota's natural resources.

  • 3 facilities were used for the nature program expansion, including: Crosby Park, Como Zoo, and the Conservatory.
  • 19,971 learners of all ages were reached during the project's biennium.
  • This was a continuation of the 1991-1993 biennium; M.L. 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 5(i).


Back to top of page


Multiple-Use Forest Management Learning Kit
Subd. 07n    $15,000 MFRF / $5,500 Nonstate Match

Mike J. Naylon
Deep Portage Conservation Reserve
Route 1, box 129
Hackensack, MN 56452

Phone:  (218) 682-2325

This project developed a hands-on, interactive, outcome-based learning kit which depicts the Deep Portage multiple-use forest and wildlife management plan.

  • The educational kit was created to be appropriate for grades 5 through 12, and adult visitors to Environmental Learning Centers.
  • 8 lessons are contained within the kit providing education in forest ecology, multi-use forest management, and the Deep Portage demonstration forest.


Back to top of page


An Outdoor Classroom to Improve Rural Environmental Education
Subd. 07o    $60,000 MFRF

Wayne Feder
Faribault County Environmental Learning Center, Inc.
Route 1, Box 41
Blue Earth, MN 56013

Phone:  (507) 526-3049 Rural citizens were provided with an environmental education program. Special emphasis was placed on Faribault County soils and the natural vegetation systems that produced them.

  • Approximately 600 Faribault County youth were involved in the development of the site, particularly in planting trees and prairie seeds.
  • Educational packets were developed for use with grades K through 12.
  • The new learning has provided an opportunity to help rural citizens understand the slow natural processes which shape the land; in addition, the center has provided baseline measurements of the land and plant life to monitor changes.


Subd. 08  Land


Back to top of page


Base Maps for 1990's - Continuation
Subd. 08a    $710,000 TF

Don Yaeger
Land Management Information Center
330 Centennial Building
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-2490

This project was the third of a four biennial effort to update the state's base mapping resources which included: a statewide air photo flight; production of a new computer-readable version of these air photo suitable for use as a base map; and, production of updated traditional paper maps for the state's major urban areas.

  • Digital mapping was developed for the northern and north-central portions of the state.
  • By the fall of 1995, digital mapping was available to well over half of the state.


Back to top of page


Rural County use of NAPP Flight
Subd. 8b    $90,000 MFRF

Richard D. Walter
Houston County Surveyor's Office
304 S. Marshall Street
Caledonia, MN 55921

Phone:  (507) 724-5814

With the establishment of a County GIS Committee, this project produced a cooperative effort to evaluate the quality and accuracy of digital planimetric maps of Houston County. The digital maps produced for a test area within the county were compared against the traditional rectified photographs and existing methods of data collection.

  • The planimetric, digital maps were found to be very accurate and user-friendly.
  • The single county-wide mapping system created a common data base that all Houston County officers can access.
  • The decision to develop accurate county-wide base maps using the National Aerial Photography Program and Geographic Information System technology has proven to be highly successful in Houston County.


Back to top of page


Recreational Resource Planning in the Metro Mississippi Corridor
Subd. 8c    $175,000 MFRF / $25,000 Nonstate Match

William R. Morrish
Design Center for American Urban Landscape
U of MN
320 Wulling Hall
86 Pleasant Street SE
College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture
Minneapolis, MN 55455

Phone:  (612) 626-0333

This project investigated the potential for enhancing and enriching the recreational opportunities between the Mississippi National River and Recreation Area (MNRRA) and the communities adjoining the MNRRA corridor. The project provided tools that have facilitated planning work across municipal boundaries emphasizing how development and environmental systems can work together to create a series of green linkages and networks that extend from the Mississippi River, connecting to upland neighborhoods.

  • Relevant data in the communities adjacent the MNRRA corridor was identified, inventoried, and mapped; from that data, a comprehensive, integrated plan for developing environmental and recreational opportunities was produced.
  • 69 municipalities, within the study area, were provided with a base of resource information, a planning language, and a set of diagrams that illustrate planning principles and processes.
  • In disseminating the findings of this study, 60 neighborhood organizations, cities, counties, resource agencies and environmental groups participated in a series of 7 public workshops.


Subd. 09  Minerals


Back to top of page


Mitigating Concrete Aggregate Problems in Minnesota
Subd. 09a    $179,000 MFRF

David E. Newcomb
U of MN
122 Civil and Mineral Engineering Dept.
500 Pillsbury Drive, SE
Minneapolis, MN 55455-0220

Phone:  (612) 626-0331

This study was conducted to explore means of mitigating concrete aggregate problems in southern Minnesota. An intensive test series was run on concrete specimens typical of the sections experiencing the D-cracking failure (that is, breakdowns associated with saturation and freeze-thaw action). Methods were developed to improve the concrete performance using existing aggregate sources. Study results conclude:

  • It may be appropriate to eliminate the use of highly porous coarse aggregates in portland concrete cement because it appears tht this type of aggregate produces a failure at the aggregate-matrix boundary tht is very difficult to mitigate.
  • Reductions in course aggregate top size seem to be effective in reducing frost damage.
  • Blending aggregate is effective in reducing frost damage.
  • Reductions in water-cement ratio produced significant improvements in the frost resistance of concrete prepared using nondurable course aggregate.
  • MnDOT has incorporated the project's findings into it maintenance and construction practices.


Subd. 10  Minerals


Back to top of page


State Park Betterment
Subd. 10a    $3,000,000 TF

John Strohkirch
DNR
Division of Parks and Recreation
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-8289

This project developed, improved, and rehabilitated state park facilities to meet growing user demand. In addition, the project prevented further deterioration of outstanding historical structures. The natural and cultural resources for future generations were protected, and at the same time, the recreational and educational needs of park visitors were provided for.

  • Acres acquired = 1,100.
  • Park/Trail Facilities created / improved = 30.
  • Approximately 100 historical sites were restored.
  • Approximately 7 million visitors are impacted every year by the accomplishments of this project.


Back to top of page


Americans with Disabilities Act: Retrofitting Regional Parks
Subd. 10b    $220,000 TF

Arne Stefferud
Metropolitan Council
Mears Park Centre
230 E. Fifth Street
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (612)291-6360

The Metropolitan Council distributed subgrants to regional park implementing agencies to retrofit existing facilities to meet federal Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. The Metropolitan Council monitored the rehabilitation projects of the implementing agencies throughout the biennium and reported the program results to the Commission.

  • Approximately 9 park facilities were developed or improved upon.
  • Improvements to park environments were made in over 15 metro region parks.


Back to top of page


Trail Linkages, Metropolitan Regional Network
Subd. 10c    $2,327,000 TF

Arne Stefferud
Metropolitan Council
Mears Park Centre
230 E. Fifth Street
St. Paul, MN 55101

Phone:  (612) 291-6360

Local governments received subgrants for the acquisition and improvement of regional trails which link existing and planned, regional, local, and state, parks and trails. The Metropolitan Council monitored the trail linkage projects of the implementing agencies throughout the biennium and reported the program results to the Commission.

  • 11.6 miles of trail were developed.
  • Work was completed on 9 trail connections in Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, and Ramsey Counties.


Back to top of page


Initiate Gateway Segment of the Willard Munger State Trail Into Downtown St. Paul
Subd. 10d    $200,000 TF / $54,000 MFRF

Dan Collins
Trails and Waterways
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-6048

A city/state partnership was initiated to acquire and develop the final portion of the Gateway Segment of the Willard Munger State Trail into downtown St. Paul.

  • 1.5 miles of trail were developed.
  • The trail was constructed for commuting and recreational purposes.


Back to top of page


Birch Lake Regional Bikeway/Walkway
Subd. 10e    $450,000 TF

Mark Burch
City of White Bear Lake
4701 Highway 61
White Bear Lake, MN 55110

Phone:  (612) 429-8563

The City of White Bear Lake developed a link from the TH96 Regional Trail with the Tamarack Nature Center. The Birch Lake Regional Trail has provided an alternative form of access to business centers, local parks and schools, and sports facilities.

  • 2.5 miles of trail were developed.
  • Of the 2.5 miles of trails, 1.8 miles are off-road and .4 miles are on-road.
  • Interpretive signs have been installed at various stations along the Rotary Nature Preserve portion of the trail.


Back to top of page


Cedar Lake Trail Development
Subd. 10f    $610,000 TF

Gary Criter
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
200 Grain Exchange
400 South Fourth St.
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:  (612) 661-4820

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, utilizing a subgrant from the Metropolitan Council, planned and constructed the Cedar Lake Trail. This non-motorized, recreational commuter trail connects Highway 100 to downtown Minneapolis and the Chain of Lakes.

  • 10 miles of trail were developed.
  • Prairie grass plantings, signs (regulatory and directional), and artificial lighting were completed to add to the visitors' enjoyment of the corridor.


Back to top of page


State Trail Development - Continuation
Subd. 10g    $2,327,000 TF

Thomas R. Danger
Trails and Waterways Unit
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-4782

The Department of Natural Resources continued acquisition and development activities to improve recreational opportunities with the state.

  • 130 miles of trail were developed.
  • Approximately 85 miles of the Paul Bunyan State Trail development was initiated.
  • Development continued on the Willard Munger State Trail between the towns of Barnum and Carlton (approximately 25 miles).
  • Acres were acquired and developed for a trail connection between the town of Harmony and the Root River State Trail (approximately 20 miles).


Back to top of page


Shingle Creek Trail Improvements
Subd. 10h    $130,000 TF

Andrew J. Lesch
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
200 Grain Exchange
400 South Fourth St.
Minneapolis, MN 55415-1400

Phone:  (612) 661-4823

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board developed the Shingle Creek Trail connection between Minneapolis and the Hennepin County Regional Trail.

  • 600 feet of trail was developed.
  • Trail connections between Minneapolis Shingle Creek Trails and Brooklyn Center were successfully completed.


Back to top of page


Lilydale/Harriet Island Regional Park Trail
Subd. 10i    $246,000 TF

Tim Agness
City of Saint Paul
25 W. Fourth St., Room 300
St. Paul, MN 55102

Phone:  (612) 292-7400

The City of St. Paul successfully designed and constructed a pedestrian and bicycle trail in the Lilydale / Harriet Island Regional Park.

  • Miles of Trail created / developed = 2.
  • Through professional service review, field work, research, and planning, the proper trail location was identified and specifications for its construction were developed.
  • The new trail has been well received by the community, as a result of the increased recreational opportunities the trail has provided.
  • The trail route takes advantage of the park's unique features, while preserving and protecting the area's natural resources.


Back to top of page


Como Park East Lakeshore Reclamation
Subd. 10j    $163,000 TF

John Wirka
City of Saint Paul
25 W. Fourth St., Room 300
St. Paul, MN 55102

Phone:  (612) 292-7400

The City of St. Paul completed site improvements in severely eroded areas on the east lakeshore in Como Park, thus, improving the water quality.

  • Public Non-Boat Access developed = 1.
  • Park/Trail Facilities developed = 1.
  • Erosion control measures were taken, as well as restorative activities, in degraded areas on the east lakeshore.
  • Parking and pedestrian paths were relocated where necessary, and regrading, landscaping, and revegetating were conducted, to aid the park in its struggle with high levels of visitor use.


Back to top of page


Acquisition of Palace Restaurant Site on Mississippi River
Subd. 10k    $325,000 TF

Albert D. Wittman
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
310 Fourth Avenue S.
Minneapolis, MN 55415

Phone:  (612) 348-2222

The Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board acquired the Palace Restaurant site located on the east bank of the Mississippi River for open space, recreational opportunities, and river access.

  • Recreational Acres Acquired = 2.
  • Public Boat Accesses developed = 1.
  • The site was properly cleared of debris and hazards after acquisition.
  • Erosion control measures were taken to stabilize the environment to better deal with the high levels of recreational use.
  • The newly acquired public property has improved the quality of life within the community and helped to stabilize property values.


Back to top of page


Access to Lakes and Rivers - Continuation
Subd. 10l    $1,000,000 TF

Michael T. Markell
DNR
Trails and Waterways Unit
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-6413

The public was provided with greater access to lakes and rivers across the state, as part of the DNR's effort to deal with increasing recreational demand. The access construction included pier, shoreline, and boat launch developments.

  • Acres acquired for parks / trails = 2.05
  • Boat Accesses developed = 4
  • Non-Boat Accesses developed = 32
  • The new and improved sites have provided Minnesotans with opportunities to access thousands of acres of water.


Back to top of page


Saint Louis River Land Acquisition
Subd. 10m    $1,000,000 TF

Steven J. Mueller
DNR
Trails and Waterways Unit
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 297-4955
Email:  steve.mueller@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (612) 297-5475

Privately held, undeveloped lands, located along the Saint Louis, Cloquet, and Whiteface rivers, were successfully acquired. The lands were acquired for the protection of the riparian zones, and the aesthetic, recreational, historical, and archeological values.

  • Acres acquired for parks / trails = 4,500
  • Public Boat Access developed = 1
  • Non-Boat Access developed = 1


Back to top of page


Lake Minnetonka Water Access Acquisition
Subd. 10n    $944,000 MFRF

Michael T. Markell
DNR
Trails and Waterways Unit
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-6413

Land was acquired on the Maxwell and Crystal Bays to expand water access opportunities for the public on Lake Minnetonka.

  • Acres acquired for parks / trails = 5
  • Public Boat Access developed = 1
  • Non-Boat Access developed = 1


Back to top of page


Lake Superior Safe Harbors - Continuation
Subd. 10o    $1,000,000 MFRF

Michael T. Markell
DNR
Trails and Waterways Unit
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-6413
Email:  mike.markell@dnr.state.mn.us
Fax:  (612) 297-5475

ML93 Chap. 172 Sec. 14 Subd.10(o) - $1,000,000
ML94 Chap. 632 Art. 2 Sec. 6 - $1,000,000

A safe harbor was acquired and constructed on Lake Superior at Silver Bay. New opportunities for access were provided for boaters and non-boaters alike.

  • Acres acquired for parks / trails = 25
  • Public Boat Access developed = 1
  • Non-Boat Access developed = 1

SILVER BAY HARBOR
ML94 Chap. 632 Art. 2 Sec. 6 - $1,000,000

This appropriation is added to the funds allocated for the Lake Superior Safe Harbor in 1993 (ML93 Chap. 172 Sec. 14 Subd.10(o).


Back to top of page


Cooperative Trails Grant Program
Subd. 10p    $800,000 MFRF

Dan Collins
DNR
Trails and Waterways Unit
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4052

Phone:  (612) 296-6048

Local trail connections to planned and existing state trails and public recreation facilities were accelerated. Local units of government utilized matching grant awards for the trail connections.

  • Careful monitoring of the grant projects was necessary to account for the funding awards.


Back to top of page


Agassiz Recreational Trails (A.R.T.)
Subd. 10q    $650,000 MFRF

Curtis Borchert
Norman County Soil and Water Conservation District
Box 60
Twin Valley, MN 56584

Phone:  (218) 584-5169

The Agassiz Recreational Trails were planned, purchased, and developed. In addition, 4 local parks were improved. The trail has effectively linked the diverse educational and recreational opportunities along the main trail located in Clay, Norman, Polk, and Red Lake counties of Northwest Minnesota.

  • Miles of Trails created / developed = 47
  • Acres acquired for parks / trails = 452
  • Park / Trail Facilities created / improved = 8


Back to top of page


Mesabi Trail Acquisition, Planning, and Development
Subd. 10r    $700,000 MFRF / $350,000 Nonstate Match

Tom Peterson
St. Louis and Lake Counties Regional Rail Authority
Route 1, Box 287B
Two Harbors, MN 55616

Phone:  (218) 834-3787

The Mesabi Trail Project initiated the planning, design, acquisition, and development of a 132-mile, multi-purpose trail located between Grand Rapids and Ely, Minnesota.

  • Of the 66 miles scheduled to be developed by the year 2000, 12 miles were completed during this biennium.


Back to top of page


Recreational Programming: Inclusiveness for Persons with Disabilities
Subd. 10s    $160,000 MFRF

Susan Rivard
Vinland Center
P.O. Box 308
Loretto, MN 55357

Phone:  (612) 479-4523

This project provided training and consultation, targeted outreach, and resource education to enhance the inclusiveness, accessibility, and utilization of programs at the Metropolitan YMCA, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB), and Camp Fire Boys and Girls by persons with disabilities.

  • Each organization made many changes - in attitudes and procedures - to facilitate participation in their programs and activities by people with disabilities.
  • Over 360 staff at the YMCA, MPRB, and Camp Fire received training on how to work with people with disabilities.
  • Over 650 consumers, parents, and professionals received targeted, persuasive, informational mailings.
  • A disability awareness training manual was developed to ensure that staff training to facilitate inclusion continues within the organizations.
  • The YMCAs served 502 disabled youth in the summer of 1994.
  • The MPRB served 393 disabled youth in the spring of 1995.


Back to top of page


Enhanced Recreational Opportunities for Southeast Asian Ethnic Communities
Subd. 10t    $300,000 MFRF

Josee' Cung
DNR
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-4745

The Department of Natural Resources worked with Southeast Asian Communities, in an effort to break through barriers of culture and language, to provide education in natural resource management and outdoor recreation. DNR and other natural resource professionals were exposed to cultural and sensitivity training to improve government relations and improve communication.

  • 4 Southeast Asian communities - consisting of 35,000 Hmong, 18,000 Vietnamese, 10,000 Lao, and 8,000 Cambodians - were reached through the project.
  • 23 community organizations became involved with the outreach project.
  • A summer youth program served approximately 900 inner-city Southeast Asian youth.
  • 2 educational materials were translated into Southeast Asian languages: the fish and game laws, and the hunting and gun safety training manual.
  • 52 cultural training sessions were held for over 1800 DNR and natural resource professionals.


Back to top of page


Urban Community Gardening Program - Continuation
Subd. 10u    $110,000 MFRF

Sue Gunderson
Sustainable Resources Center
1916 Second Avenue S.
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Phone:  (612) 872-3283

The Urban Gardening Program rehabilitated marginal and vacant urban open land into productive beautiful community green space, and, as a result, encouraged vegetable and fruit gardening in low-income neighborhoods and by under-served populations.

  • Over 55 new urban community gardens were established, with the assistance of the project, serving 6 to 50 gardeners each.
  • The gardens transformed unused, vacant, and blighted lands into community natural resources, and added value and beauty to neighborhoods ranging in socioeconomic status from St. Paul's Frogtown to Minneapolis' Uptown.
  • $14,450 worth of untreated seed was distributed to low-income gardeners.
  • Technical assistance was provided to over 50 established gardens throughout the metro area, ensuring that the gardens remained productive and well-maintained.
  • More than 800 residents attended gardening classes.
  • The project newsletter "Urban Gardener" mailing list grew to over 1400 subscribers.
  • The success of this project has encouraged plans for future urban gardening programs.


Back to top of page


National Register Grants Program
Subd. 10v    $165,000 MFRF

Britta Bloomberg
Minnesota Historical Society
345 W. Kellogg Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55102-1906

Phone:  (612) 296-5471

Significant restoration measures were accomplished and restoration and interpretation planning achieved for the Pickwick Mill in Winona County, the Sibley County Courthouse in Henderson, the Wendelin Grimm Farmstead in Carver County, and the Tugboat Edna G in Two Harbors.

  • All properties were included in this project because of their high visibility and significance as state resources.
  • The individual projects created new vision in their communities regarding the value of these resources and their interpretation and educational potential.
  • The funds available in the emergency grant category assisted an additional 11 National Register properties in need of emergency repairs.
  • Approximately 12 facilities were improved upon.
  • The people of Minnesota and visitors alike will benefit in the years to come through the preservation of these important sites and the quality of the interpretive programs.


Back to top of page


Historical Research and Planning for Traverse des Sioux
Subd. 10w    $68,000 MFRF

Robert A. Clouse
Minnesota Historical Society
345 W. Kellogg Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55102-1907

Phone:  (612)297-4701

Cultural resources and relevant social issues of the Traverse des Sioux were documented and researched. A master plan for the Traverse des Sioux historic site was developed.

  • In addition to data obtained from past studies and literature reviews, the supported archaeological investigations at the Traverse des Sioux site recovered a stone spear point which documents evidence of a 9,000 year old Native American occupation.
  • The Traverse des Sioux site, as a result of this project, has now become known as a rare Minnesota example of an undisturbed site of the Paleo-Indian Period (7,000 to 12,000 years ago).
  • A group of 6 burial mounds belonging to the pre-European contact period were mapped at the site and recommendations were made to assure their protection.
  • The research documented over 50 early historic period features relating to early missionary activity, the fur trade, commerce, transportation, and the development of the early townsite of Traverse des Sioux in the 1850s.
  • Research identified 9 interpretive themes important in telling the history of Minnesota.
  • Data gathered from the project has been used to increase preservation efforts aimed at protecting the fragile archaeological resources at Traverse des Sioux.
  • An extensive archaeological and historical research report has been made available to the regional archaeological community.


Back to top of page


Peninsula Point Two Rivers Historical Park
Subd. 10x    $435,000 MFRF / $191,000 Nonstate Match

Butch Brandenburg
City of Anoka
2015 First Avenue N.
Anoka, MN 55303

Phone:  (612) 421-6630, Ext. 480

The City of Anoka constructed and developed Peninsula Point Two Rivers Historical Park.

  • Over 100 Anoka student athletes participated in the landscaping of the park.
  • Approximately, 5 new facilities were developed.
  • Non-Boat Accesses developed = 10.
  • The public has utilized the new public facilities for historical, educational, and recreational activities.


Subd. 11  Water


Back to top of page


Minnesota River Implementation - Continuation
Subd. 11a    $1,100,000 TF

Wayne P. Anderson
MN PCA
520 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-7323

This project accelerated the adoption of Best Management Practices(BMPs) and realted state and local implementation activities for the Minnesota River Basin, including demonstration watersheds, education, BMP development, and ongoing monitoring.

4 demonstration watersheds were established to demonstrate BMP applications. 10 of 37 evaluated subwatersheds, within the Minnesota River Assessment Project, were further analyzed for the predicted benefits of BMP applications.

  • BMPs that involved far management changes were found to be readily adopted by farmers, if modest financial incentives and technical assistance were provided. BMPa that removed land from production, or transferred land from higher to lessor economic uses were resisted by farmers.
  • Adoption rates of BMPs were strongly influenced by economic factors, the presence of local resource stimulants (immediate visual benefits of BMP applications, such as lakes or streams), and local resource managers of project staff who were highly committed to the BMP adoptions.
  • Any resistance or acceptance of BMPs carried between locations and individual farmers.
  • Approximatley 20 schools and 1000+ students participated in educational programs to advance the acceptance and understanding of BMPs with Minnesota youth.
  • This project was a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium: ML 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 4(c).


Back to top of page


Local River Planning - Continuation
Subd. 11b    $480,000 MFRF

Daniel G. Retka
DNR
Division of Waters
1201 E. Highway 2
Grand Rapids, MN 55744

Phone:  (218) 327-4416

This project continued assistance to local units of government in the development of wise river management.

  • Local River plans were successfully completed on the Little Fork, Rat Root, Snake, and Vermillion Rivers.
  • Model land-use management ordinances were developed for the river watersheds which prescribe review procedures and performance standards for activities within the river corridors.
  • Designated river corridors were extended to 800 feet to better control land use activities that affect the riparian areas.
  • The management plans developed were disseminated to local, state, and federal government entities and private groups.


Back to top of page


Mercury Reduction in Fish - Continuation
Subd. 11c    $200,000 TF

George R. Rapp Jr. and Gary E. Glass
U of MN, Duluth
Archaeometry Laboratory
214 Research Laboratory Building
10 University Drive
Duluth, MN 55812-2496

Phone:  (219) 726-7957

The goals of this project were to: 1) investigate mercury sources and bioavailability mechanism in contaminated aquatic systems by identifying source bioaccumluation relationships and measure bioaccumulation effects of selected treatments in shoreline enclosures; and 2) conduct pilot studies to evaluate mechanisms for reducing mercury residue levels in fish and fish food chain organisms, and aid in developing future mitigative methods for reducing fish mercury contamination in lakes and rivers while long-term reductions in mercury usage and emissions are being evaluated and implemented. The research was conducted within the St. Louis River watershed and Sand Point at Crane Lake. Results include:

  • Several streams entering the St. Louis River Estuary displayed elevated levels of mercury and analysis of local precipitation indicated mercury inputs polluting the waterway from the surrounding region.
  • The study proved that mitigative treatment alternatives for areas of high mercury contamination may be beneficial, but that the only effective solution to the problem is pollution prevention through the reduction of mercury usage and emissions.
  • Project results have been presented throughout the United State and Canada and have served to determine future research priorities.
  • This project is a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium: ML 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 4(j) and elements of the work are continuing in the 1995-1997 biennium: ML 1995, Ch. 220 Sec. 19, Subd. 5(g).


Back to top of page


Stream Flow Protection
Subd. 11d    $280,000 MFRF

Ian Chisholm
DNR
Division of Fish and Wildlife
Ecological Services Section
Box 25, 500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4025

Phone:  (612) 296-0781

Stream habitat data was collected and utilized to create a model of the streams. The stream habitat data was combined with pre-existing information on the habitat requirements of the acquatic community. with the assembled information, assessments were made regarding the optimum waater levels for sustaining the natural aquatic life.

  • Hydraulic and physical data for high, medium, and low flows were collected at 14 sites located in 8 of Minnesota's 39 major watersheds.
  • 9 sites in 5 watershed were modeled.
  • 3 reports were completed for 3 separate watersheds, including: the Yellow Medicine Watershed Package, St. Croix Report, and Red Lake River Instream Flow Study.
  • The recommendations contained within the reports have been utilized by the Wisconsin and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, the Army Corps of Engineers, public seminars/publications, and private conservation groups.
  • This project was continued in the 1995-1997 biennium, ML 1995, Ch. 220, Sec. 19, Subd. 9(c) and is projected to be an eight biennium effort.


Back to top of page


South Central Minnesota Groundwater Contamination Susceptibility - Continuation
Subd. 11e    $290,000 MFRF

Henry W. Quade
Mankato State University
Water Resources Center
Box 70
M.S.U. Box 8400
Mankato, MN 56002-8400

Phone:  (507) 389-5492

As a continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium; M.L. 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 4(b)., this project developed a Geographical Information System (GIS) based on South Central Minnesota's subsurface geologic patterns, surface drainage, and water quality.

An appropriate methodology was developed for determining the susceptibility and the level of confidence. The level of confidence coverage developed is a representation of the uneven distribution and density of available well driller data. The level of confidence coverage may be used to establish confidence levels for specific areas on the geologic sensitivity coverage. In a periods of budget limitations and time restrictions, the level of confidence coverage may be used as a guide to prioritize the location of new water well driller logs in areas where data is sparse.

The available municipal water quality data was not adequate to evaluate the water quality of the aquifier systems in south central Minnesota.

15 workshops were conducted during the biennium to educate the public and encourage the development of county work plans for proper water resource management.


Back to top of page


Lake/Ground Water Interaction Study at White Bear Lake
Subd. 11f    $175,000 MFRF

John Linc Stine
DNR Division of Waters
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-0440

This project developed an enhanced, water-budgeting computer model to answer difficult lake level and ground level fluctuation problems for Minnesota lakes. In addition, ground water level observation wells were installed around White Bear Lake in an effort to collaborate the updated computer model data.

  • The computer model WATBUD, developed by the DNR, was expanded through the addition of a dynamic component for seepage estimation.
  • 5 water level observation wells were installed around the lake.
  • Observation well data have been collected and input into the revised WATBUD computer model for analysis.
  • A Mt. Simon-Hinckley observation well was constructed by retrofitting a former Ramsey County well.
  • Local Governments, citizens, and interested groups and state agencies have participated in a project review team.


Back to top of page


County Geologic Atlases and Regional Hydrogeologic Assessments - Continuation
Subd. 11g    $850,000 TF

David Southwick
U of MN
MN Geological Survey
2642 University Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55114

Phone:  (612) 627-4780

Sarah Tufford
DNR
Groundwater, Climatology & Water Information Systems Section
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-2431

With this program the multi-county regional hydrogeologic assessments, and the production of county geologic atlases, were expanded. The project has responded to state, regional, and local needs for geologic and hydrologic data and interpretations essential to the protection of Minnesota's groundwater. In addition, a County Services Office was established.

  • The geological components of the county geologic atlases for Fillmore, Rice, and Stearns counties were completed and published.
  • The Red River Valley regional hydrogeologic assessment was completed and published.
  • 70% of the Southwest Minnesota regional hydrogeologic assessment was completed with the rest to be finished in the next biennium.


Back to top of page


Septic System Replacement for Water Related Tourism Businesses
Subd. 11h    $500,000 MFRF

Paul Moe
Dept. of Trade and Economic Development
500 Metro Square
121 Seventh Place East
St. Paul, MN 55101-2146

Phone:  (612) 297-1391

This project enabled the replacement of failing or nonconforming septic systems located on lakes and rivers. The assistance was provided to resorts and related tourism businesses.

  • 74 projects were funded at an average cost of $6,750 per system replacement.
  • Businesses receiving assistance were located across 31 counties of Minnesota.


Back to top of page


Optical Brighteners: Indicators of Sewage Contamination of Groundwaters
Subd. 11i    $157,000 MFRF

Ronald C. Spong
Dakota County Environmental Management Department
Suite 310
14955 Galaxie Avenue West
Apple Valley, MN 55124

Phone:  (612) 891-7542

This project determined if optical brighteners, as components of domestic wastewaters and consequently potential contaminants of groundwaters, could be detected in private drinking water supplies and, therefore utilize as specific indicators of sewage pollution and correlated with more ubiquitous contaminants (e.g. nitrates, and coliform bacteria). In addition, the project studied if optical brighteners interfere with atrazine herbicide detection methods resulting in false positives if atrazine is actually below detection limits. Results include:

A fluorometric detection system for optical brighteners (fabric whitening agents) has been designed and tested in a variety of small communities and a number of soil, bedrock, and groundwater environments throughout the southeastern Minnesota.

20 small communities and 109 individual sites were evaluated to confirm that selective filter media adsorption and solid phase fluorometry may be a useful adjunct to conventional sanitary drinking water supply testing parameters, but it is limited to qualitative assessment, i.e. present or not present.

No conclusions were reached from investigations into whether certain optical brighteners with triazine structures interfere with atrazine herbicide detection methods causing false positive results if atrazine is below method detection limits.

Results and conclusions from this project have been published. Aspects of this study are being utilized by state and federally funded county studies of individual sewage treatment systems impact on subsurface waters.


Subd. 12  Wildlife, Fisheries, Plants


Back to top of page


RIM - Critical Habitat Match, Scientific & Natural Areas, Wildlife & Prairie Acquisition - Continuation
Subd. 12a    $4,000,000 TF

Jay Rendall
DNR
Division of Fish and Wildlife
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-1464

The Reinvest in Minnesota initiative was continued through the followings accomplishments:

  • 4,499 acres were acquired in 1993 for restoration and protection of Minnesota's natural environments, and native plant and animal species.
  • During this biennium approximately 5,694 acres were restored to healthy, natural conditions.


Back to top of page


RIM - Wildlife Habitat Stewardship and Property Development
Subd. 12b    $900,000 TF

Jay Rendall
DNR
Division of Fish and Wildlife
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 297-1464

The Reinvest in Minnesota program utilized prescribed burns, prairie plantings, and forest management to improve the natural communities in over 48,952 acres. In addition, 280 miles of boundary markings were completed around Wildlife Management Areas and Scientific and Natural Areas.


Back to top of page


RIM - Statewide Fisheries Habitat Development
Subd. 12c    $687,000 TF

Dirk Peterson
DNR Section of Fisheries
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-0789

The Statewide Fisheries Habitat Development project successfully improved the aquatic habitats for Minnesota fish species. The project has improved river species migration and reproduction, and reduced fish mortality on winterkill-prone lakes.

  • 12.4 miles of stream habitat were improved for trout, walleye, and smallmouth bass.
  • The Flandrau Dam on the Cottonwood River was removed effectively increasing the river fish species' migration for over 60 miles.
  • 7 lake aeration systems were purchased; 5 of the 7 new systems were installed.


Back to top of page


Establishment of Critical Winter Habitat Areas on Intensively Farmed Land
Subd. 12d    $100,000 MFRF / $60,000 Nonstate Match

David Nomsen
Pheasants Forever Inc.
2101 Ridgewood Drive NW
Alexandria, MN 56308

Phone:  (612) 763-6103

Critical winter pheasant habitat was acquired within Scott County.

  • 176 acres of land was acquired consisting of 4 tracts, each ranging from 29 to 75 acres.
  • The acquisition of the land areas has effectively established a wildlife corridor about 3 and 1/2 miles wide stretching for 10 miles.
  • The pheasant population was greatly benefited in an area that is heavily farmed and previously devoid of critical winter cover.


Back to top of page


Wild Turkey Hunting Safety/Education
Subd. 12e    $39,000 MFRF

Len Holtegaard
National Wild Turkey Federation
1590 Whitewater Avenue
St. Charles, MN 55972

Phone:  (507) 932-4866

Safety was promoted within the sport of wild turkey hunting through public service announcements and the production of a safety video presentation. In addition, relations between landowners and wild turkey hunters were improved through hunter-landowner meetings and the development and distribution of calendars.

  • 20,000 copies of "Hunting Private Land" were printed and distributed.
  • The video "Wild Turkey Hunting Safety in Minnesota" was successfully completed and distributed to the public and DNR regional offices for widespread hunter education.
  • Over 2000 calendars were distributed, which effectively promoted hunter-landowner understanding and cooperation.


Back to top of page


Niemackl Watershed Restoration
Subd. 12f    $500,000 MFRF / $300,000 Nonstate Match

Jim Breyen
DNR
2115 Birchmont Beach Rd NE
Bemidji, MN 56601

Phone:  (218) 755-3958

The Niemackl Watershed Restoration project has worked to restore the Niemackl watershed through the improvement of water quality, flood reduction, fish and wildlife habitat, and recreation through citizen participation with federal, state, and local governments, and nongovernment agencies.

  • Water quality was monitored in 9 lakes; aquatic plant surveys were completed on 11 lakes.
  • 1 sediment basin was constructed.
  • 36 conservation plans were completed for private landowners.
  • 5 sewage systems were improved.
  • 41 artificial nesting structures were constructed.
  • One 9-acre wildlife tree planting was completed.
  • 7 acres of winter wildlife food plots were established on private land.
  • 63 acres of land was planted as native prairie.
  • Fish population assessments were completed on 3 lakes.
  • Flood-monitoring bench marks were established on 14 basins, with staff gauges placed on 12 of the basins.
  • 9 tree plantings were completed for soil erosion reductions.
  • The Niemackl watershed improvement process was continued through December 31, 1997 (Laws 1996, Ch. 407, Sec. 8, Subd. 7c).


Back to top of page


Deer Critical Habitat Survey - Koochiching County
Subd. 12g    $75,000 MFRF / $5,000 Nonstate Match

Dennis Hummitzsch
Koochiching County
County Courthouse
International Falls, MN 56649

Phone:  (218) 281-6295

Frank Swendsen
DNR
Wildlife Section
Route 8, Box 8
International Falls, MN 56649

Phone:  (218) 286-5434

The Koochiching County project conducted an intensive survey of deer winter cover to identify critical habitat for deer for improved timber management and for deer population management.

  • 41,000 acres of winter cover were identified through aerial surveys and ground mapping.
  • The coniferous stands identified as winter cover were entered as collected data into the current forest inventory and Geographic Information Systems.
  • Timber management plans were written for each coniferous stand identified as winter cover.
  • The management plans developed have helped to move the county's natural resource management closer to an integrated, multi-use management approach, which will better ensure healthy deer populations amidst regulated timber harvesting.


Back to top of page


RIM - Fisheries Acquisition for Angler Access and Habitat Development
Subd. 12h    $300,000 TF

Dirk Peterson
DNR
Section of Fisheries, Box 12
500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155

Phone:  (612) 296-0789

The RIM project utilized the appropriation to improve the aquatic habitat of Minnesota native fish species.

  • Acquisitions were made totalling 6.76 miles of stream and lake shoreline, or 316.7 acres, which has improved angler access and protected fish habitat.
  • The long-term integrity of fisheries resources has been protected by securing these critical habitats.


Back to top of page


CANCELED - Establishing Goose Nesting Sites in Northern Minnesota & Relocation of Giant Canada Goslings
Subd. 12i    $21,000 MFRF / $31,890 Nonstate Match (Required match not met)

Robert D. Nylen
Geese International, Inc.
P.O. Box 225
Duluth, MN 55801-0225

Phone:  (218) 723-8064

This project will manufacture and place 160 permanent goose nesting sites in the Squaw Lake and Baudette areas and purchase a four-wheel drive vehicle capable of towing a trailer for 400 goslings. This appropriation requires a match of $31,890 from Geese International, Inc.



Back to top of page


Prairie Ecosystem Restoration in the Minneapolis Park System
Subd. 12j    $60,000 MFRF / $60,000 Nonstate Match

Jeffrey T. Lee
Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board
3800 Bryant Avenue S.
Minneapolis, MN 55409

Phone:  (612) 348-4448

Remnant and secondary prairie plant communities in the Minneapolis park system were restored through soil amendment, reintroduction of indigenous plants, and extensive maintenance.

  • Reparative work was conducted in over 10 separate park locations.
  • Some methods of repair utilized during this project included prescribed burning, rototilling, pre-emergent herbicide applications, tree and brush removal, spot seeding, and, of course, planting.
  • The management efforts have restored the degraded communities to their natural states, which has contributed to the neighborhood residents' environmental education and enjoyment.


Back to top of page


Theodore Wirth Park Tamarack Bog Preservation Project
Subd. 12k    $40,000 MFRF

Lara Keeley
People for Parks
400 South Fourth St.
Suite 200
Minneapolis, MN 55414

Phone:  (612) 661-4778

This preservation project restored the Theodore Wirth Park Tamarack Bog, improved the access trail, constructed a boardwalk, and created and installed self-guided interpretive signage.

  • Purple Loosestrife and Buckthorn populations were effectively reduced within the bog as part of the restoration effort.
  • Access to the bog was made available to the public along cedar shaving-lined switchback trails to the bog edge.
  • The construction of the boardwalk and a boardwalk bridge across the moat now allow visitors to cross over onto the bog island, which is inhabited by over 225 tamarack trees.
  • Miles of Trails created / improved = 2.
  • Over 600 native wildflowers were planted by volunteers.
  • Over 5000 copies of the park's self-touring guide book were printed and distributed.


Back to top of page


Biological Control of Eurasian Watermilfoil and Purple Loosestrife - Continuation
Subd. 12l    $400,000 TF / $200,000 Nonstate Match

Luke Skinner
DNR
Division of Fish and Wildlife
Ecological Services Section
Box 25, 500 Lafayette Road
St. Paul, MN 55155-4025

Phone:  (612) 297-3763

This project investigated biological alternatives for control of the exotics; purple loosestrife and Eurasian watermilfoil. The project researched the effectiveness of insects mycoherbicides (fungi) as control methods. The study objectives were as follows:

  • Propagation, release, and evaluation of three insect species for biological control of purple loosestrife, one weevil and two beetles.
  • Development of mycoherbicides (fungi) to control purple loosestrife.
  • Research the biology of Eurasian watermilfoil.
  • Evaluation of biological control agents for Eurasian watermilfoil, fungi, and insects.

Results included:


  • The leaf-eating beetles have been reared, established, and have exhibited the greatest potential for survival in Minnesota as insect control of the loosestrife.
  • 36 species of fungi were isolated on purple loosestrife plants sampled throughout Minnesota. Two fungi species revealed strong potential for utilization. Fungal applications on purple loosestrife were not successful in the final season of the 1993-1995 biennium. Work remains to be completed to application of fungi to plants in the field and research will continue through the next biennium.
  • Research into the Eurasian watermilfoil biology revealed 11 different genotype expressions across the state population. Clonal reproduction was found to be very important in Eurasian watermilfoil; in addition, the milfoil appeared to have poor seed germination success and poor seedling survival rates.
  • Research indicated that the weevil Euhrychiopsis lecontei is a specialist on watermilfoils and prefers Eurasian watermilfoil over northern watermilfoil.
  • Weevils were found to reduce the survival rate of Eurasian watermilfoil over winter, and, therefore reduce milfoil growth the following spring.
  • The project found that weevils are unlikely to be vectors for organisms that ate pathogens of Eurasian watermilfoil * This project was coordinated with Subd. 12(n) Integrated Control of Purple Loosestrife at the Department of Agriculture. This project is continuation from the 1991-1993 biennium; ML 1991, Ch. 254, Sec. 14, Subd. 9(b) and is continued in ML 1995, Ch. 220, Sec. 19, Subd. 13(a).


Back to top of page


Replacement of Eurasian Watermilfoil with Native Minnesota Plants
Subd. 12m    $40,000 MFRF

Edward F. Miller
White Bear Lake Conservation District
28745 Belle Creek Way
Welch, MN 55089-4459

Phone:  (612) 258-4023

This project assessed the benefits and costs of replacing Eurasian watermilfoil with native Minnesota species of aquatic plants. The replacement procedure was presented on videotape for the education of those concerned with Minnesota's freshwater environments.

  • After treatment with the 2,4, D chemical to kill the Eurasian watermilfoil, 24 quadrants were replanted over the dead milfoil with native Minnesota aquatic vegetation.
  • The Eurasian watermilfoil was not displaced from the area, but was severely limited in its growth, as a variety of native plant species were able to dominate the quadrant areas once again.


Back to top of page


Integrated Control of Purple Loosestrife
Subd. 12n    $90,000 MFRF

Dharma Sreenivasam
MN Dept. of Agriculture
Plant Protection Division
90 W. Plato Boulevard
St. Paul, MN 55107

Phone:  (612) 296-1350

This project accelerated research into biological alternatives for purple loosestrife in southeast Minnesota. Fungal pathogens and insect introductions were investigated.

  • 4 watershed sites were selected for the insect and fungal investigations. Three species of insects were evaluated on the basis of single/multiple species introductions; introduced fungal pathogens as singe/multiple applications; and finally combinations of insects and fungal pathogens.
  • Geographic separation of study sites provided information in determining the best combination of ecological factors for successful introductions and establishment of biological control agents.
  • This project is a cooperative effort involving county agriculture personnel, USDA researchers, U of M researchers, DNR and MDA.


Back to top of page


Ecological Impacts of Releasing Genetically Engineered Fishes
Subd. 12o    $175,000 TF

Anne R. Kapuscinski
U of MN
Dept. of Fisheries & Wildlife
200 Hodson Hall
St. Paul, MN 55108

Phone:  (612) 624-3019

The University of Minnesota conducted laboratory experiments to measure ecologically important bioenergetics and behavioral traits of existing growth-enhanced, genetically engineered fishes (GEF's) and related non-GEF's in an effort to advance ecological safety with GEF releases. The results were as follows:

  • Transgenic northern pike (fish containing the growth hormone gene) should grow faster than non-transgenic northern pike.
  • The transgenic northern pike should not require a higher intake of food to grow faster.
  • More experimentation of transgenic fish is necessary to confirm the findings.
  • Along with the laboratory work, the University of Minnesota, in cooperation with over 200 people from the aquatic biotechnology industry, research community, government oversight agencies, and environmental groups, developed the "Performance Standards for Safety Conducting Research with Genetically Modified Fish and Shellfish." The standards serve as a guide for decision making and fish assessment/reduction. The adoption of the standards is voluntary.

100 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Room 65 State Office Building, St. Paul, MN 55155